Housing Market Competition Heats Up

Posted On May 31 2021 by

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Housing Market Competition Heats Up Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Housing Market Competition Heats Up The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home prices reached a 15-year high in February, as demand continues to clash with historically low supply, creating increased affordability challenges, as mortgage rates begin to rise.The CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI) and HPI Forecast for February 2021 found that home prices increased 10.4% nationally, compared to February 2020. On a month-over-month basis, home prices increased by 1.2% compared over January 2021. Home prices are projected to increase 3.2% by February of 2022.“Homebuyers are experiencing the most competitive housing market we’ve seen since the Great Recession,” said Frank Martell, President and CEO of CoreLogic. “Rising mortgage rates and severe supply constraints are pushing already-overheated home prices out of reach for some prospective buyers, especially in more expensive metro areas. As affordability challenges persist, we may see more potential homebuyers priced out of the market and a possible slowing of price growth on the horizon.”CoreLogic analysis also shows homebuyers have steadily moved away from densely populated, high-cost coastal areas, in favor of more affordable suburban locales. The number of homebuyers in the top 10 metros with the largest net out-migration—including West Coast metros like Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose—who chose to move to another metro increased by three percentage points in 2020 to 21% from 2019. This sentiment is reflected in CoreLogic’s recent consumer survey, which found that 57% of current non-homeowners on the West Coast feel the home options in their area are not at all affordable.Metro areas where affordability constraints continue include Phoenix with a 16.2% year-over-year home price appreciation, Seattle with a 12.5% year-over-year rise, and the Los Angeles metro region with an 8.2% year-over-year rise in home prices. At the state level, Idaho, Montana, and South Dakota had the strongest price growth in February, up 22.6%, 19.5%, and 17.1%, respectively.“The run-up in home prices is good news for current homeowners, but sobering for prospective buyers,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, Chief Economist at CoreLogic. “Those looking to buy need to save for a down payment, closing costs, and cash reserves, all of which are much higher as home prices go up. Add to that a rise in mortgage rates and the affordability challenge for first-time buyers becomes even greater.”A recent report by Black Knight found that it now takes 20% of the median household income to make monthly payments on an average-priced home–back to the five-year average. In January and February, it was found that there were 125,000 fewer listings compared to 2020, pushing home for-sale inventory 40% below last year’s level.“Rather than an influx of homes on the market, we’re now 125,000 fewer new listings in the hole compared to the first two months of 2020 and trending in the wrong direction,” said Black Knight Data & Analytics President Ben Graboske. “With higher interest rates and a continuing shortage of inventory, it will be important to keep a careful eye on both home prices and affordability metrics in the coming months.”  Print This Post Subscribe Previous: Forbearances Drop for Fifth Consecutive Week Next: New Bankruptcies Hit 1-Year High in March April 6, 2021 790 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Eric C. Peck Affordability Ben Graboske. Black Knight CoreLogic Frank Martell Frank Nothaft Home Price Index (HPI) 2021-04-06 Eric C. Peckcenter_img Tagged with: Affordability Ben Graboske. Black Knight CoreLogic Frank Martell Frank Nothaft Home Price Index (HPI) Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Eric C. Peck has 20-plus years’ experience covering the mortgage industry, he most recently served as Editor-in-Chief for The Mortgage Press and National Mortgage Professional Magazine. Peck graduated from the New York Institute of Technology where he received his B.A. in Communication Arts/Media. After graduating, he began his professional career with Videography Magazine before landing in the mortgage space. Peck has edited three published books and has served as Copy Editor for Entrepreneur.com. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, Newslast_img read more


Growing beyond Yardfest

Posted On Mar 1 2021 by

first_imgWhat do a dodgeball tournament, a food tour of Boston’s Chinatown, a screening of “Captain America,” and meeting a professional hypnotist have in common? They’re just a few of the things that the newly revamped College Events Board (CEB) has made available to students so far this year.With its mission “to bring diverse groups of students together and create a campus atmosphere that addresses student needs outside of the classroom,” in recent years the CEB has rapidly expanded the scope and scale of its role on campus. A co-curricular board, the CEB is comprised of 23 students, with support from staff in the Harvard College Dean of Students Office.The CEB has been around for several years, but it wasn’t until 2017 that it began its expansion, when Tomika Smith was hired as a full-time adviser to the group. Before she began her tenure, CEB had been offering eight to 10 events per year. Today, that number has jumped to more than 30. Smith offers support and counsel, but is quick to point out that it is the students who are responsible for the terrific programming.“They understand what students, like them, want to see and experience,” Smith said. “I really look to CEB to take the lead, dream, and imagine, while I play a supporting role on their sideline, with the goal of cheering them on and helping them to achieve the goal.”Among the largest events the CEB puts on are the annual Yardfest celebration, which draws thousands of students to the Yard for a concert in April; Crimson Jam, a large-scale block party featuring numerous performances and games; and Harvard/Yale Spirit Week, a variety of events related to The Game.While many of the events CEB puts on center around fun and festivity, the group has helped convene discussions of serious topics as well. Last year, they hosted a discussion titled “We’re Still Here: A Discussion of Indigenous Invisibility” as part of Native American Heritage Month. Just last month, they hosted “Pride Inside Out,” a celebration of BGLTQ+ identity that brought together student performers, a seminar on LGBT history, and a keynote address from Olympian and icon Adam Rippon.,One of the overarching goals of the CEB is to provide inclusive spaces where students from different backgrounds can come together. When it comes to the number of students they attract at their events, Smith said their goal is simple: everyone.“We do intentional programming at least five times per month, with the hope that each student will and can be reached.”Natalia Bermudez ’21 joined the CEB during her first year as a member of the Crimson Traditions committee, and later served as director of the City View committee. This year, she is serving as co-president along with fellow student Jessica Herrera ’21. Bermudez considers CEB an invaluable part of her Harvard experience.“I can say without a doubt that, aside from classes and friends, CEB has been the most important part of my time at Harvard,” she said. “Most of what I’ve learned about Harvard, in terms of resources, academics, administration, and faculty, has been through CEB, whether that was talking to our upperclassmen or meeting administrators and campus partners.“CEB has taught me how to work under pressure, how to work in a team and lead one, how to time-manage, and to foresee a problem and find a solution.”Kate Colleran, assistant dean for Student Engagement and Leadership, noted the important role CEB plays in creating programming that brings together students from each of the Houses and first-year dorms.“CEB really filled a niche for having all-campus programming,” she said. “While House programming is important, CEB is the only group doing events to bring the larger Harvard College community together.”Bermudez said CEB also helps students meet new people across the College.“Some of my best memories of CEB have been seeing students come to an event by themselves, and leave with a group of people they hadn’t met before,” she said.She takes particular pride in the expanded recognition that CEB has earned across campus as the board’s programming has continued to expand.“We used to be known as ‘the people who plan Yardfest,’” she said. “And now CEB is becoming a household name.”last_img read more


Weekend Poll Top Three: Fans Can’t Wait to See Idina Menzel’s 2014 Broadway Return in If/Then

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img Idina Menzel 2. Les Miserables – 17%Even though we’ve already heard the people sing first onstage in 1987, then revived in 2006 and on-screen in 2012, fans just can’t get enough of prisoner 24601 and it’s set to come back to the Great White Way in March. The tried-and-true musical featuring music by Claude-Michel Schonberg, lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and a book by Schonberg and Boublil, is swiftly becoming a Broadway classic—and with a cast that includes Ramin Karimloo in his Broadway debut, Will Swenson, Caissie Levy and Nikki M. James, this show is guaranteed to be one of the hottest tickets of the season. View Comments Star Filescenter_img 3. Aladdin – 11%Aladdin, Princess Jasmine and the Genie are heading to Broadway (finally!), and 11 percent of fans are so ready to take a magic carpet ride to the New Amsterdam Theatre. Based on the 1992 Disney movie featuring music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, the new Broadway tuner also features additional lyrics and a new book by Chad Beguelin. In a few short weeks, you can catch the production on Broadway—until then, you’ll have to settle for belting out “A Whole New World” in the shower like you usually do. There are 22 brand new productions currently scheduled to hit the Great White Way in 2014, and with new revivals of Cabaret and Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Violet starring Sutton Foster, All the Way led by Bryan Cranston and a stage adaptation of Bullets Over Broadway, how can we pick just one? Well, we can’t, so we asked you to make the tough decision, and three shows—all musicals—stood out among the crowd. Which productions are Broadway fans most excited to see in 2014? Check out the results below!1. If/Then – 25%Tony-winning Wicked and Rent favorite Idina Menzel is making her long-awaited return to Broadway in If/Then, and Broadway fans are absolutely psyched! The new musical by Next to Normal composing duo Tom Kitt and Bryan Yorkey picked up a quarter of the votes. If/Then tells the story of Elizabeth, a woman who decides to rebuild her life in New York City. Plus, it features a Rent reunion between Menzel and Anthony Rapp! Only two months and counting until If/Then hits the Broadway stage—mark your calendars.last_img read more


Marenave’s Final Vessels Sold Off

Posted On Sep 28 2020 by

first_imgThe remainder of the fleet once owned by German shipping trust Marenave Schiffahrts has been sold through a bank-driven process, data provided by the company shows.The data lists a mix of six tankers, two containerships, four bulk carriers and a car carrier as sold. The majority of the fleet was disposed of in March, May and June, respectively, while the final two ships were sold in the second half of September, according to data provided by VesselsValue.The two ships in question, the LR1 tankers Mare Pacific and Mare Atlantic, reached a price tag of USD 5.9 million and USD 5.4 million. VesselsValue data also shows that the 68,500 dwt tankers, built in 2001, were purchased by Greece-based Stalwart Management.With the final vessels disposed, the company has fulfilled the conditions for its restructuring, as earlier set by Marenave’s financing banks.However, the company’s existence was once again put into question in mid-September as the proposed capital reduction, another condition for implementing the restructuring concept, was rejected by key shareholders.At the annual general meeting held on September 15, members postponed capital reduction. Consequently, the investment agreement involving CPO Investments GmbH & Co. KG (Offen Group) and DEVK Allgemeine Versicherungs-Aktiengesellschaft fell through.The shipping trust started its negotiations with the financing banks in late 2016 in order to avoid insolvency after it received notice from the two banks financing the Marenave-fleet stating that Marenave’s restructuring concept will not be supported.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more


Update on the latest sports

Posted On Sep 18 2020 by

first_imgThe team, which is under pressure to change its name during the ongoing national reckoning over racism, said Saturday that Mitchell’s No. 49 will become only the second jersey in the franchise’s 88-year history to be retired. The other is the No. 33 of Hall of Famer Sammy Baugh.Mitchell, Washington’s first African American player, died in April. The Redskins were the last NFL team to integrate the roster.Significantly, dropping Marshall’s name from the lower bowl of the stadium follows by one day the removal of his statue at RFK Stadium, the team’s former home. Marshall moved the team from Boston to Washington and resisted integrating the roster with Black players until “forced to do so” in 1962.The team’s announcement of the change did not mention Marshall, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1963 and died in 1969. Yankees, Mets to train in New York if MLB resumesUNDATED (AP) — The Yankees and Mets would train in New York if Major League Baseball and its players try to start the coronavirus-delayed season. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Saturday, and the teams confirmed the decisions.The Yankees originally had intended to base at their spring training complex in Tampa, Florida. The Mets had said they were undecided between Citi Field and their training camp in Port St. Lucie, Florida. But positive cases for COVID-19 in Florida have increased markedly in recent days, while the percentage of positive tests in New York City has dropped sharply.All 30 MLB teams have closed their spring camps in Florida and Arizona this weekend over virus concerns.MLB had hoped to start the season during the first week of July, but teams and the players’ association are engaged in a bitter fight over how to apportion revenue losses caused by the pandemic. Both sides agree that players need three weeks of training before the increasingly slight season could start. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditHORSE RACING-BELMONTBelmont kicking off Triple Crown series(Eds: Post time is 5:42 p.m. EDT) — The NBA has firmed up the schedule for what will be a hectic time for teams this fall. The league has set Oct. 16 as the date for this year’s draft and says clubs can begin talking to free agents two days later. The annual moratorium will begin at 12:01 a.m. Eastern time on Oct. 19 and continue through noon on Oct. 23. The league told teams of the plans Saturday in a memo obtained by The Associated Press.— Kansas State has paused all voluntary workouts for football student-athletes for two weeks following the most recent COVID-19 test results. As of Friday, 14 student-athletes had tested positive for active COVID-19 following testing of more than 130 student-athletes. The school says those who tested positive are being medically managed according to current health guidelines. That includes self-isolation for 10 days and until a patient is without fever for 72 hours without medication, whichever takes longer. Athletics director Gene Taylor says the university feels that temporarily pausing all football workouts and access to facilities is the best decision for everyone. — As universities begin the process of playing sports through a pandemic, some are requiring student athletes to sign waivers acknowledging the risks for COVID-19. Ohio State and Missouri have pledges they are requiring athletes or their parents to sign before the players can take part in voluntary workouts. How much legal protection any of these forms provide schools is up for debate, along with the ethics of requiring unpaid students to sign them. Athletes have already tested positive at more than a dozen schools from Boise State to Clemson, though some schools are not releasing details.— NASCAR heads to Talladega Superspeedway this weekend with new rules and more fans. The Alabama track will admit up to 5,000 fans on Sunday, just 48 hours after Stewart-Haas Racing confirmed two of its employees tested positive for the new coronavirus. The new rules are in response to Ryan Newman’s crash in the Daytona 500, but there is no practice or qualifying scheduled, so drivers won’t have a feel for the adjustments until the race begins. NASCAR also will be on the lookout for the newly banned Confederate flag.— The NASCAR Cup race at Texas will have thousands of spectators in the stands. Texas Governor Greg Abbott has approved a comprehensive action plan submitted by the track to allow fans for the July 19 race. While the state allows 50% capacity for outdoor sporting events, track president Eddie Gossage says it’s too early to know how many fans will be able to attend. With social distancing protocols in place, the speedway first must reassign seating for people who had already purchased tickets for the race that was originally scheduled for March 29. The track capacity is about 135,000. Associated Press Update on the latest sportscenter_img June 20, 2020 In other developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic:— Three members of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers organization have tested positive for the novel coronavirus at the team’s training facility, and the team has closed affected areas of the building. Management says the affected areas will remain closed until extensive sanitizing is completed. All individuals who may have been exposed have been notified and are following the established protocols, the Bucs said in a statement. That includes a 14-day quarantine period. The team did not identify the people who tested positive. The NHL’s Tampa Bay Lightning closed their facility earlier this week after three players and two staff members tested positive.— The Toronto Maple Leafs aren’t commenting on reports that star player Auston Matthews has tested positive for the coronavirus. The Leafs say a player’s medical information is private. The Toronto Sun and The Toronto Star report that the center tested positive. According to the Sun, the 22-year-old Matthews has self-quarantined in his Arizona home and hopes to be ready to play if the NHL season resumes. The NHL hopes to open training camps next month, and finish off the 2019-20 season later this summer.— Canada’s approval of the NHL’s return-to-play proposal has led the league to consider designating one or more cities north of the border to serve as hubs for its 24-team playoff format. Officials say Canada’s top public health officer as well as the top health officers of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Toronto worked closely with the NHL to approve the plan. It required an exemption because the U.S.-Canada border is currently closed to all non-essential travel until at least July 21 and those who enter Canada must self-isolate for 14 days.— Five-time PGA Tour winner Nick Watney tested positive Friday for the coronavirus, the first player with a confirmed infection since golf resumed its schedule last week. Watney withdrew immediately from the RBC Heritage and must self-isolate for at least 10 days under the PGA Tour’s protocols. The tour began its phase of contact tracing and identified 11 people who were tested Friday evening. All results came back negative. Secondary tests were given, and those results were not expected before Saturday night. ELMONT, N.Y. (AP) — Tiz the Law is the star of a 10-horse field for the Belmont Stakes, perhaps the biggest event in U.S. sports since the coronavirus pandemic shut down competition in mid-March. The 3-year-old colt is the early 6-5 favorite for Saturday’s race.No fans or owners will be at the New York track for the $1 million race that is being run at a shorter distance this year. This Belmont — rescheduled from June 6 — will be run at 1 1/8 miles, the first time since 1925 it won’t be its usual grueling 1 1/2 miles. The top four finishers earn Kentucky Derby qualifying points, including 150 to the winner.Tiz the Law is the only horse in the race with Grade 1 stakes victories. He’ll try to buck history as the first New York-bred in 138 years to win the $1 million race. His 82-year-old trainer, Barclay Tagg, is chasing a win that eluded him in 2003 after Funny Cide won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness only to lose his Triple Crown bid in the Belmont.The Belmont is kicking off the Triple Crown series for the first time, instead of completing the series of three races run over five weeks. The Kentucky Derby follows on Sept. 5, with the Preakness finishing up on Oct. 3.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS — The Chinese basketball league has restarted after an almost five-month shutdown for the coronavirus pandemic but is going ahead in empty stadiums and with fewer foreign players. The CBA was suspended on Jan. 24 after the virus outbreak in Wuhan. The semifinals stage has started with 20 teams divided into two divisions and limited venues to reduce travel. All stadiums are closed to fans. League chairman and former NBA star Yao Ming praised the work of the clubs and health authorities for helping get the season restarted. He says as the first national large-scale sports event to be restarted in China the CBA is of “strategic significance.”— French soccer authorities will allow fans back into stadiums starting July 10, with an initial limit of 5,000. The president of the French Football Federation says it is possible more spectators will be allowed into the French Cup final at the end of July and for the resumption of top-tier Ligue 1 play at the end of August. The French government called off the country’s 2019-20 soccer season on April 28 as part of efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic.NFL-REDSKINS-HONORING MITCHELLRedskins retire Mitchell’s jersey, rename stadium levelUNDATED (AP) — The Washington Redskins will retire the jersey of Hall of Famer Bobby Mitchell. They will also rename the lower level of FedEx Field for him, replacing the section named for former owner George Preston Marshall.last_img read more


’SC’s Star Seniors: Q&A with Jackie Gilbert

Posted On Sep 16 2020 by

first_imgQ: What have you had to sacrifice in order to be a student-athlete? Q: What is your schedule like? Q: What is it like to be part of a relatively new program? It’s [fun] to be part of a program that’s still growing and new. I was blessed to be part of the freshman class that still had that first senior class to come in. I got to see the process they went through, what they had worked through, and now, you go full circle to a new and different team. But each group that I was with has brought something different. This team has grown so much, and there’s been so many great times and great years. My freshman and sophomore years, we were really top. We had a little bit of a growing year last year. Again, this year, we’ve come back strong and [have] all come together. It’s  exciting to see the up-and-downs and now to be on the road to success, [to] be in a group that’s been doing well. It’s a lot of memories all together. There’s been so many things with my team, and all these experiences we have to go through are unique. Things like travel trips are really special to being a student-athlete and things that you can’t get back. I don’t have a specific memory that stands out, but being with my team, being in the locker room, just hanging out. Being down the street from one of my friends and being able to hit them up and go get lunch — those are the things that I am going to miss most when I graduate. It’s much harder in the real world to be able to hang out with your friends. I think it’s just the college experience. I’m sure I haven’t been perfect, but anything I haven’t done right, I’ve been happy for messing up and whatnot. All those lessons that I’ve learned have somehow helped me [later on]. For the most part, I’ve tried my best to squeeze USC in school and service and lacrosse, [to] try to get the most out of it possible. I’m happy with mistakes I have made because I’ve learned a lot from [them], so no huge regrets off the top of my mind. Q: Do you have any regrets from the past four years? My strongest advice when it specifically comes to athletics is to learn to go with the punches. There’s going to be a lot of conflicts, there’s going to be a lot of things that are going to come with being a student athlete, but learning how to take it and go with it and not sit in the moment and complain about it — that’s a big learning curve. That’s going to stop you a little bit from being successful. That’s something that every freshman has to learn. There’s a lot on your plate. For many college students, four years of school can seem to fly by quickly. For student-athletes, grueling workouts, travel and the rigors of competing at the Division I level can make it go by even quicker. In this series, the Daily Trojan sits down with senior athletes playing various sports at USC to discuss their experience over the past four years, from their athletic life to their academic life. This week’s senior is women’s lacrosse defender Jackie Gilbert, a team captain who made last year’s Pac-12 All-Conference First Team. We have our practice block from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Since I’m a senior, my classload isn’t crazy schedule-wise. In previous years, there would usually be class afterward from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., and at 6 p.m., you’re usually studying and doing homework. If you’re traveling, you’re trying to fit in homework and all that, which is usually the hardest. It’s all about prioritizing and trying to get stuff done right away. It’s a lot, but it’s well worth it. Q: What is your favorite memory at USC?center_img We do have to sacrifice a lot, especially if you want to be a top student, too. That’s the hardest balance — being able to have fun and have time with your friends as well as be a top student athlete and a top student. You’re going to have to lose something between there — not be able to go out as much and stuff like that. It’s all about balance. It’s all about knowing what areas are you strong in, when can you have fun? It’s a lot of learning. For the most part, I enjoy it. I enjoy the nature of having to juggle things. If anything, I’d find it harder if I had more time. I’ve appreciated being a student-athlete because it’s made it personally easier. The more things I have, I’m probably more organized. Q: What’s one thing about lacrosse that most people don’t know? Q: What’s next for you? Q: Do you have any advice for freshman athletes? I’m a real estate major and business minor, so afterward I’m working at a company called Eastdil Secured, which does real estate investment sales and investment banking. I hope to try to continue professional lacrosse, if I can do it with my job. But the good thing about our team and culture is everyone really appreciates each other. Our defensive unit is super close. When someone does something that maybe the crowd doesn’t notice, we know and we appreciate it. The game of lacrosse – the intricate details – are something that is still expanding on the west coast. Michelle Mankoff/Daily Trojan There’s probably a lot of things people don’t know. On the west coast, you still get asked, ‘What is lacrosse?’ and whatnot. Things that people don’t know about lacrosse are things that are more intricate to the game and what it takes to be a really good player and especially a defender. It is growing a lot. I’m from the Bay Area. I’ve been here through the growing of lacrosse from when I started in middle school to where it is now. It’s gaining a lot more popularity. I see more and more people out at middle schools playing it. There’s more and more recognition on the west coast. More and more people are getting to know about it, which is really exciting.last_img read more


Tipp school hoping for Munster glory

Posted On Sep 9 2020 by

first_imgThe Premier County face Laois.Throw-in at the Laois Training Centre is at 2 o’clock. The Tipperary school are taking on Scoil Phobal Rathmore in the final of the Munster B football competition.The match, which starts at 12.30pm, is being played in Ballygiblin near Mallow in County Cork.Meanwhile, Tipperary are in action in the 2nd Round of the Peter McNulty U21 football tournment this afternoon.last_img