Qld home values: Rich getting richer, poor getting poorer

Posted On Sep 28 2020 by

first_imgHouses and apartment buildings are seen in the blue chip Brisbane suburb of Hamilton. Image: Darren England/AAP.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus14 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market14 hours agoOver the final quarter of 2018, Brisbane home values fell 0.1 per cent, while across regional Queensland, they declined 0.2 per cent.But in the 12 months to December last year, home values in the Queensland capital rose by 0.2 per cent.CoreLogic research analyst Cameron Kusher said weaker housing market conditions nationally were being influenced by a downturn across the capital cities, especially in Sydney and Melbourne. A new home is seen under construction. Image: AAP/Brendan Esposito.“Despite a strong start to last year, approvals for detached houses have taken a turn for the worse, declining in the second half of 2018 and ending six per cent down on the previous 12 months,” Mr Bidwell said. “The figures also reveal that the slide in unit approvals has slowed, and are down four per cent when compared to the previous 12 months.” The luxury homes of Sovereign Islands on the Gold Coast. Photo: Glenn Hampson.Capital city home values are 6.7 per cent lower than their peak.Mr Kusher said regional housing markets were holding up better than the capital cities.It comes as the latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal building approvals in Queensland have dropped to their lowest level since mid-2014.Master Builders Queensland deputy chief executive Paul Bidwell said the 39,995 approvals recorded at the end of 2018 was in stark contrast to the peak of 52,000 approvals in August 2016.center_img Expensive homes in Queensland are gaining in value and more affordable ones are falling, research shows. Image: Darren England/AAP.THE divide between rich and poor is getting bigger in Queensland’s housing market.Research reveals the most expensive homes in the state have risen in value over the past year, while properties at the lower end of the market have fallen.Analysis from property researcher CoreLogic shows home values across the most affordable sector of the state’s market dropped 0.8 per cent in 2018, while values in the top quarter of the market increased 0.1 per cent.In Brisbane the gap is even wider, with values falling half a per cent across the most affordable properties and rising a third of a per cent among the most expensive.It supports anecdotal evidence from real estate agents on the ground who are reporting higher sale prices for prestige properties. last_img read more


Early signing period the latest loss for USC coach Clay Helton

Posted On Aug 14 2020 by

first_imgIt’s hard to believe Helton is so concerned about winning when he sports a 13-11 record the past two seasons. Even so, Signing Day was a loss for USC. And things will get even worse if the Trojans lose to Iowa in the Holiday Bowl.In an incredible display of bad timing, USC sent out a video in the middle of the worst signing day ever with Bohn and several players asking fans to travel to San Diego next week for the bowl game.It was promptly scorned on social media, like so many things involving USC these days. WOLF: USC, Mike Bohn must answer Helton question sooner rather than laterIf you want an example of how much things have changed for USC, none of the top 25 players in the state has signed or committed to the Trojans. Only one, wide receiver Gary Bryant Jr. of Corona Centennial, is expected to end up at USC. Just two years ago, the program signed the top four players in the Golden State.The reasons are simple: Helton’s precarious job security has created uncertainty, which will continue into next season. But perhaps more damaging is the perception among recruits that USC does not develop its players. Add in the idea that the best football is played in the SEC, Big Ten or Clemson, and things have gotten even more difficult for the Trojans.“I just feel like it’s different towards the Midwest, the East, the South, just because they cherish their football so much,” said quarterback CJ Stroud of Rancho Cucamonga, about 45 miles from USC. Stroud signed with Ohio State.It’s not just a USC problem. It’s a Pac-12 problem. In 2015, 16 of the top 25 players in California stayed in their home state. In 2020, 19 have already signed or committed to out-of-state schools; only one stayed in state.USC fans who were furious that Helton kept his job were irate again on Wednesday, especially when athletic director Mike Bohn not only promised recruiting would improve “dramatically,” but also said it was going better than people wanted to admit.Helton tried to put his best spin on the recruiting class during his early signing period news conference, which as of Wednesday was just 11 players.”At the end of the day I’m not about perception, I’m about wins,” Helton said.“It’s not going to be the national ranking because you just don’t have the numbers, but it does fill the needs,” he said. “And I’m more worried, again, about wins than I am about winning today. I’m more worried about winning on Saturday.” When five-star linebacker Justin Flowe grabbed an Oregon hat and announced he would play for the Ducks on Wednesday, it put the finishing touch on the worst-ranked recruiting class in USC history — or at least since 1999, which is as far back as 247Sports’ recruiting team rankings go.Trojans coach Clay Helton may have saved his job two weeks ago, but he couldn’t persuade recruits to play for his team. According to 247Sports’ Composite rankings, USC finished the first day of college football’s early signing period with the 78th-ranked recruiting class, right between Bowling Green and Louisiana. That ranks last in the Pac-12, and nine places behind the second-worst Pac-12 recruiting class: Arizona, at 69.last_img read more


Good wins for Gaynstead, C’down in urban netball

Posted On Jan 20 2020 by

first_imgDefending junior and senior urban netball champions, Gaynstead High and Camperdown High, were off to impressive wins in the second round of the ISSA urban schoolgirls competition which got underway at the Leila Robinson Courts on Thursday.In Group I junior action the Dalton Hinds-coached Gaynstead whipped St Hugh’s 26-9 while in Group II among the Seniors the Wayne Stewart-coached Camperdown High were too strong for Tivoli High beating them 53-17.Coach Hinds was very impressed with his team’s start to their second round campaign.”Naturally, I am pleased with the result in our opening game as the expectation is to go all the way and defend our title and we are expecting to continue winning although I see all teams at this stage as big threats,” said Hinds.St Jago High and St. Andrew Technical were also victorious in Group I action among the Juniors. The Spanish Town-based St Jago had a 24-16 win over Papine while in a very close encounter, St. Andrew Technical got the better of Camperdown 24-22.In Group II there were wins for former champions the Queen’s School, Norman Manley High and St. Catherine High.Queen’s got the better of Holy Childhood 31-25, Norman Manley were too good for Wolmer’s winning 28-10 while St Catherine had a good 37-18 win over Campion College.Second round action will continue next Wednesday November 9 at the same venue.last_img read more


Minister admits Pathologist shortage at public hospitals

Posted On Jan 17 2020 by

first_imgpublic Health Minister, Dr George Norton has admitted that there is indeed a shortage of pathologists in the public health sector in Guyana.During an interview with Guyana Times, Dr Norton confirmed that the health sector is in dire need of Pathologists as it is running low on these professionals.According to the Minister, the scarcity of such professionals is solely based on the lack of formal post graduate programmes where these persons can be trained in the mentioned field of work.Dr Norton said that a number of persons within the medical field have shown their interest in taking up pathology as a permanent occupation but this is usually not accomplished since Guyana lacks the adequacies that are required for training in the sector.In this case, he cited, it is not a case of there being a limited number of persons who want to take up pathology but rather the inefficient resources to undertake training in the area of work.Since the post graduate programme is not offered in Guyana, the Minister said medical personnel in the field are required to undergo training overseas, which has a hefty cost attached to it. The finances that are attached to this programme training; however, are not subsidised by the Government.“These overseas training are generally sponsored by companies and private organisations since post graduate programmes in pathology are not offered in Guyana,” he informed.With the conditions surrounding the field of medical work as it relates to financing and moving overseas to facilitate training, Dr Norton highlighted that the shortage situation is high on the agenda of the Public Health Ministry. He added that much thought is being given to how these specialist doctors’ can be trained in Guyana by means of a post graduate programme which would significantly increase the number of pathologists available in Guyana.He disclosed that a number of countries including Cuba, Mexico, Brazil and China have offered to facilitate the students to undergo training, and the Ministry is currently contemplating the proposal.Under the previous Administration, the shortage of these specialists had persisted and the Ministry then had declared an emergency state of the pathology sector.However, during that time, the indicated cause had been a deficient of individuals who were passionate about taking up the career option.The Ministry had noted this while urging persons to indicate their interest in pathology after which the Government would work to make scholarships available for them so they can be a part of the post graduate training programme.Younger persons were specifically targeted since in that time, there were two pathologists who were both above the age of retirement.last_img read more