Renewed Hope for Broward Family of FBI Agent Bob Levinson Held in Iran

Posted On Sep 20 2020 by

first_imgU.S. officials for years said Levinson was working for a private client on his trip to Iran. In December 2013, The Associated Press reported that the ex-agent had actually been on a mission for CIA analysts who had no authority to run spy operations.Since his disappearance, photos and video of Levinson in an orange jumpsuit emerged in 2010 and 2011. His family is suing Iran in U.S. federal court under the allegation that the Iranian government kidnapped him.FBI posterIran has acknowledged there is an open Revolutionary Court case involving Levinson, but a foreign ministry spokesman said Sunday that the case was a “missing person” filing — not a sign that the ex-agent was being prosecuted.Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced last week that the State Department would offer $20 million on top of a previously posted $5 million reward for information on Levinson’s case.“The Trump administration has made clear that the regime in Iran must release all missing and wrongfully detained Americans, including Robert Levinson, Xiyue Wang, Siamak Namazi, and others,” Pompeo said in a statement. “We will not rest until they are reunited with their families.”Dan Levinson said his family has never given up hope Levinson’s alive even though they haven’t heard from him in 12 years, making him the longest-held hostage in U.S. history. The Coral Springs family of former FBI agent Bob Levinson held captive in Iran for over a decade, is emboldened in their fight for his release.Last week, the U.S. government announced a $20-million reward for information leading to his location and safe return.That’s on top of the $5-million FBI award.FILE – In this March 6, 2012, file photo, an FBI poster showing a composite image of former FBI agent Robert Levinson, right, of how he would look like now after five years in captivity, and an image, center, taken from the video, released by his kidnappers, and a picture before he was kidnapped, left, displayed during a news conference in Washington. Iran is acknowledging for the first time it has an open case before its Revolutionary Court over the 2007 disappearance of a former FBI agent on an unauthorized CIA mission to the country. In a filing to the United Nations, Iran said the case over Robert Levinson was “on going,” without elaborating. The Associated Press obtained the text of the filing Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)President Donald Trump on Sunday used Twitter to urge Iran to turn over former FBI agent Robert Levinson, who disappeared in 2007 on an unauthorized CIA mission.“If Iran is able to turn over to the U.S. kidnapped former FBI Agent Robert A. Levinson, who has been missing in Iran for 12 years, it would be a very positive step,” the president wrote. last_img read more


Wallace says ‘disrespectful’ former CWI boss will never get support for ICC chairman

Posted On Sep 18 2020 by

first_imgFORMER West Indies and Barbados batsman, Philo Wallace, believes the combative leadership style of former CWI president Dave Cameron means he will never get the support of the current board, in his bid for ICC Chairman.Cameron has written to CWI, seeking its nomination to stay in contention for the position.  The former CWI boss had already received the nomination of The United States Cricket Hall of Fame for the post.The Cricket West Indies (CWI) board is, however, yet to decide on backing its former chairman, with current vice-president Dr. Kishore Shallow suggesting the body’s support for Cameron would be unlikely.  Nor does Wallace, for that matter, believe it should be expected, based on the often-stormy tenure of Cameron’s presidency.“I think it is going to be difficult for Cricket West Indies to support Dave Cameron in his bid to be ICC Chairman.  First of all, there is animosity between Cricket West Indies and Dave Cameron.  Those who are members or directors of Cricket West Indies will say there is, and he will find it very hard to get their support,” Wallace told the Mason and Guest radio programme.“I honestly believe that Dave Cameron should just tell himself ‘i’ve run West Indies cricket for six years’ and just leave it out and just be an observer now, because going up for the ICC job and looking for the West Indies support, it can’t work,” he added.The ICC is yet to finalise a nomination route for selecting the successor of Shashank Manohar following his resignation from the post of ICC Chairman after a two-year tenure.  Should he receive support, Cameron could go up against Former England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) head Colin Graves and president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and former Indian skipper, Sourav Ganguly.“It’s like trying to get a dumpling up a hill.  Unfortunately, he isn’t going to get the support of Cricket West Indies and we all know it.  It’s very sad that a former president has come to this, a former president of West Indies cricket, but sometimes the way that you rule comes back to bite you, there is something called karma…he disrespected leaders and prime ministers in the region and that cannot work.”(Sportsmax)last_img read more


Crashing net for rebounds has become Orange ice hockey’s bread and butter

Posted On Sep 17 2020 by

first_img Published on December 8, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+ The act of crashing the net symbolizes Paul Flanagan’s Syracuse ice hockey team. And the scene of the team’s leading scorer, Isabel Menard, doing just that is one of many. The success that has been generated in similar situations has created a new mindset for the players as well. ‘I think I should be doing that more,’ said Menard, a sophomore forward. ‘Anybody that takes a shot, I will just crash. I know last year I didn’t do that enough, but this year I’m trying to focus on that a little bit more.’ On that play, Menard skated from the right side of the ice into the attacking zone and sent a wrist shot toward the net. The puck was blocked, but with three Syracuse players surrounding the net, the puck crossed the goal line seconds later. Just another rebound goal sent home by Megan Skelly. The red light turned on, and the offensive onslaught continued. The Orange caught fire this weekend and kept Wayne State’s goalkeeper Delayne Brian busy in the process. SU (8-7-2) has a good chance to extend its two-game winning streak against Princeton (4-10-1) in a two-game series this weekend.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text And the Orange will still be clawing for those rebound goals that have been there all season. This year, when Menard enters the offensive zone, she has one objective in mind. ‘Get the puck toward the net and generate a rebound,’ she said. With a monthlong break on the horizon, Flanagan sees a successful weekend as added motivation for SU at the halfway mark of the season. ‘We have a real good opportunity to play a real good team down at Princeton and finish up the semester in a real good way,’ Flanagan said. ‘Hopefully all our energy is used to get ready for that game and final exams.’ The Tigers may provide the Orange an opportunity to end the first half of the season on the right foot. Syracuse’s offense has been able to create numerous scoring chances in its last five games, meaning the opportunities to come away victorious are there. Now teams need to be weary of how the puck is coming off of any Syracuse player’s stick. Last weekend’s goals came following slap shots and wrist shots or simply anything fired on net. Anything that would create a rebound. When the Orange generated enough shots on goal, it led to greater scoring opportunities. The Orange scored three of its five goals during Saturday’s contest with the Warriors off rebounds. SU players are beginning to understand the rewards that can come from crashing the net. For the Orange, this weekend’s series may be one of its best opportunities to get wins away from the Tennity Ice Pavilion this season. With six of the team’s nine games on the road in the month of January, Flanagan hopes his team will make the most of this opportunity. ‘I think we feel that we need to win all of our points at home and steal some on the road if we want to position ourselves to be a high seed in the playoffs,’ Flanagan said. ‘One of our goals is to get back to that championship game.’ SU may be playing Princeton at just the right time. The Tigers have given up 14 goals in their last five games. The recent offensive success of the Orange could carry the team successfully into break. Following Saturday’s victory against Wayne State, Skelly acknowledged that sweeps are important confidence builders for the rest of the season. Especially heading into the team’s heavily-concentrated conference schedule following break. ‘Our goal at the beginning of the year was to get to that CHA conference final,’ Skelly said. ‘This should instill some confidence in the team that we are a great team and we can win.’ The Princeton series presents a big chance for the Orange — as long as it continues to play its crashing style of hockey. ‘It would be really nice to finish up with a sweep,’ Flanagan said. ‘And come back here in January, re-energized with a good record to start off the new semester.’ [email protected]center_img Commentslast_img read more


Crashing net for rebounds has become Orange ice hockey’s bread and butter

Posted On Sep 17 2020 by

first_img Published on December 8, 2010 at 12:00 pm Facebook Twitter Google+ The act of crashing the net symbolizes Paul Flanagan’s Syracuse ice hockey team. And the scene of the team’s leading scorer, Isabel Menard, doing just that is one of many. The success that has been generated in similar situations has created a new mindset for the players as well. ‘I think I should be doing that more,’ said Menard, a sophomore forward. ‘Anybody that takes a shot, I will just crash. I know last year I didn’t do that enough, but this year I’m trying to focus on that a little bit more.’ On that play, Menard skated from the right side of the ice into the attacking zone and sent a wrist shot toward the net. The puck was blocked, but with three Syracuse players surrounding the net, the puck crossed the goal line seconds later. Just another rebound goal sent home by Megan Skelly. The red light turned on, and the offensive onslaught continued. The Orange caught fire this weekend and kept Wayne State’s goalkeeper Delayne Brian busy in the process. SU (8-7-2) has a good chance to extend its two-game winning streak against Princeton (4-10-1) in a two-game series this weekend.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text And the Orange will still be clawing for those rebound goals that have been there all season. This year, when Menard enters the offensive zone, she has one objective in mind. ‘Get the puck toward the net and generate a rebound,’ she said. With a monthlong break on the horizon, Flanagan sees a successful weekend as added motivation for SU at the halfway mark of the season. ‘We have a real good opportunity to play a real good team down at Princeton and finish up the semester in a real good way,’ Flanagan said. ‘Hopefully all our energy is used to get ready for that game and final exams.’ The Tigers may provide the Orange an opportunity to end the first half of the season on the right foot. Syracuse’s offense has been able to create numerous scoring chances in its last five games, meaning the opportunities to come away victorious are there. Now teams need to be weary of how the puck is coming off of any Syracuse player’s stick. Last weekend’s goals came following slap shots and wrist shots or simply anything fired on net. Anything that would create a rebound. When the Orange generated enough shots on goal, it led to greater scoring opportunities. The Orange scored three of its five goals during Saturday’s contest with the Warriors off rebounds. SU players are beginning to understand the rewards that can come from crashing the net. For the Orange, this weekend’s series may be one of its best opportunities to get wins away from the Tennity Ice Pavilion this season. With six of the team’s nine games on the road in the month of January, Flanagan hopes his team will make the most of this opportunity. ‘I think we feel that we need to win all of our points at home and steal some on the road if we want to position ourselves to be a high seed in the playoffs,’ Flanagan said. ‘One of our goals is to get back to that championship game.’ SU may be playing Princeton at just the right time. The Tigers have given up 14 goals in their last five games. The recent offensive success of the Orange could carry the team successfully into break. Following Saturday’s victory against Wayne State, Skelly acknowledged that sweeps are important confidence builders for the rest of the season. Especially heading into the team’s heavily-concentrated conference schedule following break. ‘Our goal at the beginning of the year was to get to that CHA conference final,’ Skelly said. ‘This should instill some confidence in the team that we are a great team and we can win.’ The Princeton series presents a big chance for the Orange — as long as it continues to play its crashing style of hockey. ‘It would be really nice to finish up with a sweep,’ Flanagan said. ‘And come back here in January, re-energized with a good record to start off the new semester.’ [email protected]center_img Commentslast_img read more


“Buy local,” agro-processors urge Guyanese

Posted On Jan 12 2020 by

first_img– as ‘Uncapped’ exhibition and marketplace gets underwayBy Jarryl Bryan“Buy local” was a prevailing theme of the ‘Uncapped’ agro processors expo as it got under way on Sunday. There were several local exhibitors urging locals to support local items while reminding supermarkets of their local obligations.The ‘agro-processors exhibition and marketplace’ held at the National Stadium had the backing of several companies, including Sterling Products, Edward B. Beharry and Sons, Banks DIH and Exxon Mobil. This publication caught up with several agro processors.According to Rihanna, a representative of the National Milling Company of Guyana, (NAMILCO), the onus is on Guyanese to buy local. NAMILCO’s products are stocked across Guyana, and she stressed the importance of consumers paying attention to what they buy.“We have a new product, the Vanilla cake flour. We have free samples. Right now Scenes from the Uncapped exhibitionNAMILCO is coming up with these health products. We are promoting healthiness. We have the whole wheat flour in a packet, and we also have multi-grain and wheat germ.“We have roti mix and polouri mix. The polouri mix is quick and easy for customers to make a fast meal. The roti mix, to make work easier, you just have to add water to get that perfect roti. We want you to support local,” she said.Noting that there is foreign flour on the local market, she urged customers to read labels intently. Pointing to the importance of adhering to expiry dates, she stressed that NAMILCO provides quality. Added to that, she noted, is the inclusion of recipes on the packages.Other productsThe Guyana Marketing Corporation (GMC) was also out in full force. This Government entity’s booth featured several sections of produce, ranging from packaged plantain chips to packaged coconut cream and honey — all stocked by the Guyana shop, itself stocked by agro processors.Explaining the process, a representative noted that to be a supplier to the Guyana Shop, products must be agro-processed, and the supplier business must itself be registered in Guyana. In addition, each processor must have a valid certificate of inspection from the Government Analyst—Food and Drugs Department and a valid food handler’s certificate.“We are displaying here the (products) offered by GMC, particularly the Guyana Shop, where we have all the local agro processed products in Guyana. We have most of the agro processors here, but some couldn’t make it. So we’re supporting,” the representative said.“Most of them have their own farm, but some of them would buy from other farmers and process it — slice it, fry it, and package it. And then they bring it to us. These are things we sell every day, including cassava breads, cassareep, and honey.”At another booth, exhibitors hailing from Essequibo had packaged coconut water on sale for $300 a bottle. Roosters Coconut, the company selling the beverage, use coconuts reaped at its very own farm.“The company is owned by Roopan Ramotar,” Farzad Ally, a representative of the company, related. “I do distribution and sales. I recently joined the company, but they’ve been in existence before. We have our own factory, we do our own bottling, our labels. And we do export.”Value of the ExpoDr. Vishnu Doerga, a former President of the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI), was there in his capacity as the face of Action Coach Guyana — a company that not only offers complementary entrepreneurship training, but also professional support services for business owners looking to grow their companies.Doerga noted the importance of events such as Uncapped to give agro-processors a chance to shine. According to the businessman, it provides a platform to introduce consumers to the products and brands of agro-processors. Doerga urges consumers to actively support local producers.“The consumers in our country have a lot to do with this. They have to start getting serious and buy local products. And if the product is not up to standard, you tell the persons their packaging is not where it’s supposed to be, their product quality needs to improve,” Doerga urged.“Go into the supermarket you buy from and ask the supermarket owner, ‘Why you aren’t stocking local products?’ If you keep buying foreign products, the supermarket owners are going to continue stocking foreign products. So consumers have a lot to do in moving Guyana and its agro-processors forward,” he explained.It is understood that the GMSA had collaborated with the Government and private enterprises in order to host the first ‘Uncapped’ last year at the Sophia Exhibition Complex. That three-day exhibition had also featured a food festival that saw some 60 exhibitors and thousands of patrons.This year, there was a noticeable crowd at the National Stadium. It is expected that Uncapped will be held in other regions of the country throughout the year.last_img read more