Why Single-Family Green Homes Are Slow to Catch On


Posted On Dec 16 2019 by

first_imgAs a counterpoint the the optimism I expressed in my last post about multifamily green buildings, recent discussions with single-family builders leave me feeling less than enthusiastic about the prospects for green single-family housing.I recently had lunch with the local head of a large national builder who expects to build about 500 homes per year in several Georgia suburbs. I attempted (in vain, it turns out) to convince him that there was value in building better quality homes – that they could design for high performance from the beginning rather than use standard stock plans. I ran on about tighter envelopes, centrally located HVAC systems zoned for multiple floors and with compact duct systems, pointing out that increases in some areas could offset higher costs in others.He said his company did not want to spend a nickel more than the approximately $48 per square foot they were building for. In addition, he said something memorable: that his customers wouldn’t buy a house with one HVAC system when his competitors’ homes had two. They would feel like they were being shortchanged, regardless of how the house performed. RELATED ARTICLES Size MattersBuild SmallerWhy Weatherization Isn’t EnoughJust Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole HouseThe Pretty Good HouseGreen Building for Beginners Send in the reinforcementsThe following day I met with another builder, a client of mine who is building about 10 homes in a small in-town subdivision. I mentioned my discussion with the production builder about the number of HVAC systems he installs in each home, and his response reinforced the other builder’s position.He said that if there isn’t a separate HVAC system on each floor of a house, buyers think they are not getting their money’s worth. And they think that bigger systems are better than smaller ones. He said he can usually get away with a zoned system for the third floor attic area, but if he were to install a single system to condition a two- or three-story house, he would have trouble selling it even if the buyers were told it was more efficient and would work perfectly well. This point resonated with me, and made me realize that we need to change consumer perceptions to make high-performance homes desirable.center_img More and bigger is what they wantAccording to several reports, after a brief period where home sizes remained stable or reduced, new single-family home sizes are back on the rise.I had hoped that the industry and consumers had learned some sort of lesson from the last real estate crash, but it appears that they haven’t. People still want big homes, and with mortgage rates at historic lows and energy prices lower due to expanded natural gas resources, there may be little to stop this trend.And with those big houses, people want more and bigger equipment: refrigerators, ranges, showers, and HVAC systems. I must say, it was a pretty dispiriting week of builder conversations for me, tempering some of my optimism about multifamily housing. Time for a drink.last_img

Last Updated on: December 16th, 2019 at 11:11 am, by


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