Sextortion How to protect your children from sexual predators online

Posted On Sep 17 2019 by

Yahoo Exec Tapped To Head Prometheus Global Media

Posted On Sep 14 2019 by

first_img“In stewarding the iconic brands of PGM, Guggenheim Digital Media will forge even stronger partnerships across all Guggenheim-related media and entertainment assets, including Dick Clark Productions,” Todd Boehly, president of Guggenheim Partners, wrote in an announcement, as initially reported by Adweek. “GDM will also make new, ground-breaking investments and partnerships in the music, media, technology, and digital entertainment spaces that meaningfully build on and expand our current portfolio. And, while new digital media investments will be a core focus going forward, we also plan to continue our investment in both the print versions and live events of our existing properties.”In addition to his two-year term at Yahoo, Levinsohn has spent time in traditional media—mainly television. He has worked with HBO, CBS Sportsline and Fox Interactive. While his background seems to be mainly in digital and broadcast media, the new CEO reassured his new team that traditional magazine media still has a place in the company.”While there’s digital in the title of this company, the importance of print goes without saying,” he said in a meeting with New York employees, Adweek reports. “I don’t think print is something that goes away.” Stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, follow us on Facebook & Twitter! Yahoo’s former interim-CEO Ross Levinsohn (pictured) may have been passed over for Marissa Mayer this summer, but he is now back in an executive driver’s seat—this time as CEO of Prometheus Global Media, publisher of Adweek, The Hollywood Reporter, Back Stage and Billboard, among others.  In an additional change-up that comes with the new CEO, the company has been renamed Guggenheim Digital Media (GDM), according to an announcement posted on Adweek. Financial services firm Guggenheim Partners has acquired the remaining stake in Prometheus from Pluribus Capital.This is the second CEO change up for the company in the last six months—in July, Guggenheim Partners senior managing director Dottie Mattison was named CEO of Prometheus Global Media. Mattison will stay on as a member of the board of GDM.last_img read more


Google sued by shareholder alleging sexual misconduct coverup

Posted On Sep 10 2019 by

first_imgGoogle’s board of directors and executive leadership have been accused of covering up allegations of sexual harassment against former executives. Getty Images A Google shareholder has filed a lawsuit against the company’s executive officers and board of directors, alleging the company concealed sexual misconduct allegations against former executives.The lawsuit, filed by shareholder James Martin, stems from hefty severance packages Google reportedly gave executive Andy Rubin, the creator of the Android mobile operating system, and Amit Singhal, head of Google’s search unit until 2016. Allegations of sexual harassment against the two men were found to be credible by company investigations, according to the lawsuit.”Rubin was allowed to quietly resign by defendants Larry Page and Sergey Brin after an internal investigation found the allegations of sexual harassment by Rubin to be credible,” according to the complaint, filed Thursday in California state court. “While at Google, Rubin is also alleged to have engaged in human sex trafficking — paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to women to be, in Rubin’s own words, ‘owned’ by him.”The lawsuit comes during a period of prominent figures in industries ranging from politics to entertainment being toppled by revelations of sexual harassment or sexual assault. In the tech industry, companies like Uber have wrestled with accounts of work environments fraught with varying degrees of sexual harassment. High-profile venture capitalists like Chris Sacca and Dave McClure have been unseated, as well, over sexual harassment allegations. Google paid Rubin $90 million after Page asked for his resignation following an allegation Rubin coerced a female employee into performing oral sex in a hotel room in 2013, according to a New York Times report in October.  Singhal stepped down as Uber’s senior vice president of engineering in 2017 after the ride-hailing company discovered he’d allegedly been accused of sexual harassment while he was employed at Google. He resigned from Google in 2016 after reportedly being accused of sexually harassing a female employee in a different department at Google.Rubin and Singhal have denied the allegations. The lawsuit accuses the board and executives of breach of fiduciary duty, unjust enrichment, abuse of power and corporate waste. Defendants include Page and Brin, former Chairman Eric Schmidt, CEO Sundar Pichai, former human resources director Laszlo Bock, chief legal officer David Drummond, Rubin and Singhal, among others.A similar lawsuit was filed Wednesday by Northern California Pipe Trades Pension Plan and Teamsters Local 272 Labor Management Pension Fund.In November, Google employees around the world staged a coordinated walkout to protest the company’s handling of the sexual harassment allegations. The walkout’s organizers said more than 20,000 full-time workers and contractors participated in the Nov. 1 protest.Some of the Google employees involved in the walkout released a statement Thursday in support of the lawsuits.”We have all the evidence we need that Google’s leadership does not have our best interests at heart,” they said.Google didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 0 Post a comment iHate: CNET looks at how intolerance is taking over the internet. Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about “women in tech.” Tech Industry Tagscenter_img The top 10 products of CES 2019 Share your voice 10 Photos Googlelast_img read more


Baltimore Souls to the Polls Sunday in Baltimore

Posted On Sep 1 2019 by

first_imgSen. Verna Jones-Rodwell, chair and members of the Baltimore City State Senate Delegation along with local Inter-Faith leaders, announced the “Souls to the Polls mobilization Movement,” Oct. 23, at Union Baptist Church in West Baltimore.Sunday, Oct. 26 has been designated as “Souls to the Polls” Sunday, when early voting for the 2014 General Election will occur from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. In addition to mobilizing the faith community, faith leaders from across the City in a concentrated effort will encourage their congregants to vote early and make them aware of early voting polling locations. “We are in the final leg of this election season and everyone must exercise their right to vote,” Sen. Jones- Rodwell said.Eligible voters may participate in early voting throughout the Baltimore Metropolitan Region. For more information, contact Poetri Deal at 410-841-3612  or Verna. Jones.District@senate.state.md.us.last_img read more


The Drone Industry Thoughts From an Outsider

Posted On Aug 30 2019 by

first_img I’ve always loved technology and recently became one of the growing number of Americans to buy a drone. Like many drone operators, I marvel at the current commercial and recreational applications as well as the potential for the future. The FAA estimates there are 1.9 million drones used by hobbyists in the U.S. today. By 2020, this number is expected to rise to 4.3 million, showing the huge growth potential for this fledgling industry.Related: Walmart Wants Drones in Stores Shopping for YouBut before this industry expands further, there are a few very valid concerns we need to address. Even as a newcomer, I can immediately recognize the responsibility drone operators need in regards to safety and privacy. As unmanned aerial vehicles become ubiquitous, the technology will move faster than the laws meant to regulate the industry. Thus, it’s crucial that the drone industry is proactive at self-regulation. This includes collaboration between manufacturers to create an industry standards board to oversee the implementation of enhanced safety software, as well as the education for drone operators, and the public, about drone usage.This may create more obstacles for the industry’s short term profits, but its long-range sustainability will be given the chance to flourish when the public sees drones as a beneficial tool, not some snooping eye in the sky.We’ve all heard the stories of drones spying on sunbathing women. As cliché as it is, this happened to my wife while she was on our “private” deck and a drone suddenly appeared above her. While Americans recognize the benefits of drones, especially when used for search and rescue purposes or safety inspection, privacy infringement concerns remain due to misuse of the technology.The government is trying to keep pace. There are state laws in place that outlaw using a drone to capture images of either a nude or partially nude person. But the keywording in these laws is “capturing images” because states can’t dictate where drones can legally fly. These flight path regulations are determined by the FAA, which doesn’t deal with privacy issues, only airborne safety.These sets of guidelines and state laws are inconsistent across the country and lack enforcement, which opens the door for non-compliance. With these challenges comes opportunity. If the drone industry can be proactive by rolling out systems that protect public privacy and safety, it can avoid public backlash as widespread drone usage increases.Related: UPS Tests Drone-Based Package DeliveriesTo keep hobbyist and commercial drones seen as a positive tool, the industry needs to add software that makes it readily apparent when a drone is filming. This could include loud beeps every 10 seconds while recording or every time a drone takes a photo, as well as including bright flashing lights to make it more visible to anyone on the ground. While this does not address government or law enforcement surveillance, it’s a step in the right direction for privacy protection in the hobbyist and commercial markets.While peeping on women dominates the headlines, there is also the potential for much more serious safety concerns. Manufacturers have taken some initiative on protecting public safety by installing collision avoidance algorithms. But the current technology only works if the drone is flying forward, not while ascending, or flying sideways or backwards. Perfecting this safety system will help alleviate concerns regarding collisions with aircraft, people, powerlines and other drones.Geofencing software is also currently available in most high-end consumer drones to limit flying in restricted airspace. DJI, the market leader in the recreational sector, has led the charge with this technology, due in large part to a DJI drone crashing on the White House lawn in 2015. By perfecting this technology and making it ubiquitous across all models, the industry can keep critical airspace uncrowded and decrease public safety concerns.  One other major challenge we face is getting drone pilots, young and old, to think and act like commercial airline pilots. These pilots follow safety procedures that have been honed over the past 100 years, including a keen understanding of how human factors, technological limitations and safety systems are interrelated. While the FAA does require drone operators to pass a series of exams for commercial use, the same is not required for hobbyists.The lack of proper training leads to major safety concerns. If any teenager in America (and beyond) can get a drone for Christmas or their birthday, what systems are in place to ensure they use it safely? I’m not trying to suggest that every single drone owner needs to take extensive FAA courses in order to fly. But we do need a standardized training course of high-level safety points as well as a primer on local, state and federal laws.Related: Drone Accidents: Not Your Fault?The sky is the limit for the growth of the drone industry. The issues that could lead to public backlash or government intervention are known. Now it’s up to us as pilots — and the industry as a whole — to prevent this from happening by self-regulating while the government plays catchup.With improved hardware and software that’s pervasive across different manufacturers and models, we can ease privacy and safety concerns. Meanwhile, standardizing basic education will help bring a sense of professionalism and accountability to all new pilots. This is not something we do soon, this is something we need to do now to ensure this transformative technology continues to grow and improve virtually every aspect of our work and lives. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 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