Wilmington School Lunch Menus Week of June 9 2019

Posted On Sep 11 2019 by

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are the Wilmington Public Schools lunch menus for the week of June 9, 2019.Wilmington High School & Wilmington Middle SchoolMonday, June 10, 2019High School: ExamsMiddle School: French Toast Sticks with Syrup; Sausage Link; Hashbrowns; Fresh FruitTuesday, June 11, 2019High School: ExamsMiddle School: Chicken Patty or Spicy Chicken Patty on a Wholewheat Roll; Steamed Veggies; Fresh FruitWednesday, June 12, 2019Last Day Of School — NO LUNCHThursday, June 13, 2019No SchoolFriday, June 14, 2019No SchoolLunch ($2.65-$2.85) includes: Entree (main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Juice and 8 oz. Assorted Lowfat Milk or Skim MilkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices at High School: Salad Bar, Pizza, Soup & Choice of SandwichAlternate Daily Lunch Choices at Middle School: Pre-made SaladAlso Available Daily: Variety of Fresh Fruit, Side Caesar salad or Baby Carrots, WG Bagel with Cheese StickMenus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School ProgramWest Intermediate, North Intermediate, Shawsheen Elementary, Woburn Street ElementaryMonday, June 10, 2019French Toast Sticks with Syrup; Sausage Link; Hashbrowns; Baby Carrots; Fresh FruitTuesday, June 11, 2019Chicken Patty or Spicy Chicken Patty on a Wholewheat Roll; Steamed Veggies; Fresh FruitWednesday, June 12, 2019Last Day Of School — NO LUNCHThursday, June 13, 2019No SchoolFriday, June 14, 2019No SchoolLunch ($2.40) includes: Entree (Main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Justice and MilkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices: Ham & Cheese, Turkey & Cheese, Tuna, Salad Bar (Woburn St. only), Premade Salads (North, West & Shawsheen only), Pizza (Mon & Wed only), Bagels (Tues & Thurs only)Also Available Daily: Assorted Lowfat Milk or Skim Milk; Assorted Fresh Fruit; Assorted Juice; DessertMenus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School ProgramBoutwell Early Childhood Center & Wildwood Early Childhood CenterMonday, June 10, 2019French Toast Sticks with Syrup; Sausage Link; Hashbrowns; Baby Carrots; Fresh FruitTuesday, June 11, 2019Chicken Patty or Spicy Chicken Patty on a Wholewheat Roll; Steamed Veggies; Fresh FruitWednesday, June 12, 2019Last Day Of School — NO LUNCHThursday, June 13, 2019No SchoolFriday, June 14, 2019No SchoolLunch ($2.40) includes: Entree (main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Juice and assorted lowfat or skim milkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices: WG Pizza (Mon. & Wed. only); Whole Wheat Bagel & Cheese Stick (Tues. & Thurs. only); Turkey & Cheese sandwich on WG bread (Mon., Wed., Fri. only); Ham & Cheese sandwich on WG bread (Tues. & Thurs. only)Also Available Daily: Assorted snacks and baked goods ($0.50-$0.60)Menus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School Program(NOTE: View these menus, plus the Gluten Free menus, online HERE. The cover photo is from Jamie Boudreau’s Airgoz Aerial Photography.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of August 26, 2019)In “Education”Wilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of September 2, 2019)In “Education”Wilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of September 9, 2019)In “Education”last_img read more


Tesla CEO Elon Musk hints at opening Gigafactory in India

Posted On Sep 5 2019 by

first_imgElon Musk, the founder of US-based electric car manufacturer Tesla Motors, has hinted at setting up a Gigafactory in India to manufacture lithium-ion batteries in order to address the problem of power shortage in the rural areas of the country.”Given high local demand, a Gigafactory in India would probably make sense in the long term,” Musk tweeted.If the plan is implemented, it would give the much-needed boost to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s efforts to bring Tesla’s technology to the country to “power India’s rural homes,” the Business Standard said.During his visit to the US last month, Modi held discussions with Musk at the Tesla campus in Silicon Valley on the potential of having a battery making facility and other renewable energy technologies in India. The Modi government aims to generate 100 GigaWatt of solar power by 2022. But the country has commissioned solar power plants with a total capacity of just 4.57 GW as on 22 October.A study by Deloitte and the Confederation of Indian Industry in August showed that India has the capacity to produce 759 GW of solar power.Tesla is already making a power storage device named as PowerWall, which is highly expensive for the Indian market. High cost and difficulties in raising its production “will likely keep the invention from coming to India any time soon.”Regarding Tesla cars, Musk said: “Auto import duties are prohibitively high. Hoping for a special category for EVs. Most of our discussion (with Modi) was on batteries.”last_img read more


The Drone Industry Thoughts From an Outsider

Posted On Aug 30 2019 by

first_img I’ve always loved technology and recently became one of the growing number of Americans to buy a drone. Like many drone operators, I marvel at the current commercial and recreational applications as well as the potential for the future. The FAA estimates there are 1.9 million drones used by hobbyists in the U.S. today. By 2020, this number is expected to rise to 4.3 million, showing the huge growth potential for this fledgling industry.Related: Walmart Wants Drones in Stores Shopping for YouBut before this industry expands further, there are a few very valid concerns we need to address. Even as a newcomer, I can immediately recognize the responsibility drone operators need in regards to safety and privacy. As unmanned aerial vehicles become ubiquitous, the technology will move faster than the laws meant to regulate the industry. Thus, it’s crucial that the drone industry is proactive at self-regulation. This includes collaboration between manufacturers to create an industry standards board to oversee the implementation of enhanced safety software, as well as the education for drone operators, and the public, about drone usage.This may create more obstacles for the industry’s short term profits, but its long-range sustainability will be given the chance to flourish when the public sees drones as a beneficial tool, not some snooping eye in the sky.We’ve all heard the stories of drones spying on sunbathing women. As cliché as it is, this happened to my wife while she was on our “private” deck and a drone suddenly appeared above her. While Americans recognize the benefits of drones, especially when used for search and rescue purposes or safety inspection, privacy infringement concerns remain due to misuse of the technology.The government is trying to keep pace. There are state laws in place that outlaw using a drone to capture images of either a nude or partially nude person. But the keywording in these laws is “capturing images” because states can’t dictate where drones can legally fly. These flight path regulations are determined by the FAA, which doesn’t deal with privacy issues, only airborne safety.These sets of guidelines and state laws are inconsistent across the country and lack enforcement, which opens the door for non-compliance. With these challenges comes opportunity. If the drone industry can be proactive by rolling out systems that protect public privacy and safety, it can avoid public backlash as widespread drone usage increases.Related: UPS Tests Drone-Based Package DeliveriesTo keep hobbyist and commercial drones seen as a positive tool, the industry needs to add software that makes it readily apparent when a drone is filming. This could include loud beeps every 10 seconds while recording or every time a drone takes a photo, as well as including bright flashing lights to make it more visible to anyone on the ground. While this does not address government or law enforcement surveillance, it’s a step in the right direction for privacy protection in the hobbyist and commercial markets.While peeping on women dominates the headlines, there is also the potential for much more serious safety concerns. Manufacturers have taken some initiative on protecting public safety by installing collision avoidance algorithms. But the current technology only works if the drone is flying forward, not while ascending, or flying sideways or backwards. Perfecting this safety system will help alleviate concerns regarding collisions with aircraft, people, powerlines and other drones.Geofencing software is also currently available in most high-end consumer drones to limit flying in restricted airspace. DJI, the market leader in the recreational sector, has led the charge with this technology, due in large part to a DJI drone crashing on the White House lawn in 2015. By perfecting this technology and making it ubiquitous across all models, the industry can keep critical airspace uncrowded and decrease public safety concerns.  One other major challenge we face is getting drone pilots, young and old, to think and act like commercial airline pilots. These pilots follow safety procedures that have been honed over the past 100 years, including a keen understanding of how human factors, technological limitations and safety systems are interrelated. While the FAA does require drone operators to pass a series of exams for commercial use, the same is not required for hobbyists.The lack of proper training leads to major safety concerns. If any teenager in America (and beyond) can get a drone for Christmas or their birthday, what systems are in place to ensure they use it safely? I’m not trying to suggest that every single drone owner needs to take extensive FAA courses in order to fly. But we do need a standardized training course of high-level safety points as well as a primer on local, state and federal laws.Related: Drone Accidents: Not Your Fault?The sky is the limit for the growth of the drone industry. The issues that could lead to public backlash or government intervention are known. Now it’s up to us as pilots — and the industry as a whole — to prevent this from happening by self-regulating while the government plays catchup.With improved hardware and software that’s pervasive across different manufacturers and models, we can ease privacy and safety concerns. Meanwhile, standardizing basic education will help bring a sense of professionalism and accountability to all new pilots. This is not something we do soon, this is something we need to do now to ensure this transformative technology continues to grow and improve virtually every aspect of our work and lives. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 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