Syracuse-Colgate men’s basketball: Beat writers predict SU by varying margins

Posted On Sep 16 2020 by

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 11, 2016 at 2:58 pm Syracuse kicks off its season on Friday at 7 p.m. in the Carrier Dome against Colgate. The Orange beat Colgate 78-51 last season. With a new cast of characters, SU is ranked No. 19 to start the season. For everything you need to know about Colgate, click here.Here’s how our beat writers forecast Syracuse’s season opener.Connor GrossmanOverbiteSyracuse 71, Colgate 62Despite losing its top three shooters from last year, the biggest question for Syracuse doesn’t involve offensive production. Rather, how quickly can the team’s new players learn the zone? Jim Boeheim tinkered around with pressing and man-to-man defense in two exhibition games, and the results were unspectacular. The Orange won’t struggle to score on Colgate, and is a near-lock to win. But just how close will Syracuse let the Raiders get to their lead?Matt SchneidmanSqueaky cleanSyracuse 78, Colgate 58AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe longest winning streak for one Division I team against another belongs to the Orange, against the Raiders. Syracuse gets to flash its new pieces for the first time in the regular season and it’s the fresh faces — Andrew White and Tyus Battle – who along with Tyler Lydon guide No. 19 SU to an easy win in game one.Paul SchwedelsonBrushing upSyracuse 76, Colgate 50Syracuse imposes its will from the start and cruises to victory. It’s still early November and the Orange still has a lot to work on but SU is ranked No. 19 to start the year for a reason. Jordan Swopshire (43.8 percent) and Sean O’Brien (42.6 percent) are sharp-shooters from the outside, but as long as Syracuse defends the 3, the Orange should have no problem capitalizing on its size advantage down low. Commentslast_img read more


’SC’s Star Seniors: Q&A with Jackie Gilbert

Posted On Sep 16 2020 by

first_imgQ: What have you had to sacrifice in order to be a student-athlete? Q: What is your schedule like? Q: What is it like to be part of a relatively new program? It’s [fun] to be part of a program that’s still growing and new. I was blessed to be part of the freshman class that still had that first senior class to come in. I got to see the process they went through, what they had worked through, and now, you go full circle to a new and different team. But each group that I was with has brought something different. This team has grown so much, and there’s been so many great times and great years. My freshman and sophomore years, we were really top. We had a little bit of a growing year last year. Again, this year, we’ve come back strong and [have] all come together. It’s  exciting to see the up-and-downs and now to be on the road to success, [to] be in a group that’s been doing well. It’s a lot of memories all together. There’s been so many things with my team, and all these experiences we have to go through are unique. Things like travel trips are really special to being a student-athlete and things that you can’t get back. I don’t have a specific memory that stands out, but being with my team, being in the locker room, just hanging out. Being down the street from one of my friends and being able to hit them up and go get lunch — those are the things that I am going to miss most when I graduate. It’s much harder in the real world to be able to hang out with your friends. I think it’s just the college experience. I’m sure I haven’t been perfect, but anything I haven’t done right, I’ve been happy for messing up and whatnot. All those lessons that I’ve learned have somehow helped me [later on]. For the most part, I’ve tried my best to squeeze USC in school and service and lacrosse, [to] try to get the most out of it possible. I’m happy with mistakes I have made because I’ve learned a lot from [them], so no huge regrets off the top of my mind. Q: Do you have any regrets from the past four years? My strongest advice when it specifically comes to athletics is to learn to go with the punches. There’s going to be a lot of conflicts, there’s going to be a lot of things that are going to come with being a student athlete, but learning how to take it and go with it and not sit in the moment and complain about it — that’s a big learning curve. That’s going to stop you a little bit from being successful. That’s something that every freshman has to learn. There’s a lot on your plate. For many college students, four years of school can seem to fly by quickly. For student-athletes, grueling workouts, travel and the rigors of competing at the Division I level can make it go by even quicker. In this series, the Daily Trojan sits down with senior athletes playing various sports at USC to discuss their experience over the past four years, from their athletic life to their academic life. This week’s senior is women’s lacrosse defender Jackie Gilbert, a team captain who made last year’s Pac-12 All-Conference First Team. We have our practice block from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Since I’m a senior, my classload isn’t crazy schedule-wise. In previous years, there would usually be class afterward from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., and at 6 p.m., you’re usually studying and doing homework. If you’re traveling, you’re trying to fit in homework and all that, which is usually the hardest. It’s all about prioritizing and trying to get stuff done right away. It’s a lot, but it’s well worth it. Q: What is your favorite memory at USC?center_img We do have to sacrifice a lot, especially if you want to be a top student, too. That’s the hardest balance — being able to have fun and have time with your friends as well as be a top student athlete and a top student. You’re going to have to lose something between there — not be able to go out as much and stuff like that. It’s all about balance. It’s all about knowing what areas are you strong in, when can you have fun? It’s a lot of learning. For the most part, I enjoy it. I enjoy the nature of having to juggle things. If anything, I’d find it harder if I had more time. I’ve appreciated being a student-athlete because it’s made it personally easier. The more things I have, I’m probably more organized. Q: What’s one thing about lacrosse that most people don’t know? Q: What’s next for you? Q: Do you have any advice for freshman athletes? I’m a real estate major and business minor, so afterward I’m working at a company called Eastdil Secured, which does real estate investment sales and investment banking. I hope to try to continue professional lacrosse, if I can do it with my job. But the good thing about our team and culture is everyone really appreciates each other. Our defensive unit is super close. When someone does something that maybe the crowd doesn’t notice, we know and we appreciate it. The game of lacrosse – the intricate details – are something that is still expanding on the west coast. Michelle Mankoff/Daily Trojan There’s probably a lot of things people don’t know. On the west coast, you still get asked, ‘What is lacrosse?’ and whatnot. Things that people don’t know about lacrosse are things that are more intricate to the game and what it takes to be a really good player and especially a defender. It is growing a lot. I’m from the Bay Area. I’ve been here through the growing of lacrosse from when I started in middle school to where it is now. It’s gaining a lot more popularity. I see more and more people out at middle schools playing it. There’s more and more recognition on the west coast. More and more people are getting to know about it, which is really exciting.last_img read more


Cycling Club laments having to pay Police for road races

Posted On Jan 11 2020 by

first_imgThe executives of the Flying Ace Cycling Club (FACC) are lamenting that they are now required to pay the Police a sum of money to run off cycle road races.FACC Coach Randolph Roberts has expressed disappointment over a decision by the Guyana Police Force B Division which will now see his Club paying for the services offered by the Police there whenever it stages its cycling meets.According to Roberts, he was required to pay the Police a total of $15,000 to stage a road race recently. Roberts, who continues to work voluntarily to develop the sport of cycling, exclaimed that this was the first time he has ever paid the Force for its services rendered on race day.“I worked with all the Commanders in this Division and I have never had such a situation.  I had a discussion with the Commander and I told him that we are not holding a gate to collect any money, so that we could get money to pay back the Police. I go out there and deal with the business community so that we could get these youngsters off the street and involved in something that is worthwhile for their lives. I cannot afford to pay the Police $15,000 whenever I have a race,” Roberts said, adding that the first prize for many races did not reach the $15,000 level.Sponsor of the said race, Franco Crawford is in disagreement with the charge of $15,000 to run off a non-profitable cycle race.“I am surprised that the Police Force which is meant to protect, is now charging $15,000 just to host a bike event. I think that is not good because when they start doing this and we don’t have enough money to give to the cyclists to encourage them and for them to purchases chains and tyres for their training and for their racing and then we have to pay the Police then we may not be able to sponsor any event or to have any event if we had to pay the Police.”In an invited comment, Divisional Commander Assistant Commissioner Lyndon Alves said it was a policy of the Force to be paid for its services. The Commander added that he apologised that it was not done nor told to the Cycling Club in the past, but it was a requirement that the Club pays.last_img read more