Internet-based business tactics are focus of new Champlain College online courses

Posted On Jan 1 2021 by

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Area experts in Internet marketing and business practices are teaching five new ‘mini-courses’ at Champlain College this summer and fall. The online courses are well-suited to business professionals who want to use Internet technologies to advance their organizations. Each of the one-credit courses runs for five weeks.”These are tactics that don’t require traditional textbook teaching,” said Elaine Young, director of Champlain’s e-Business Management program. “These are practical, ready-to-use-right-away courses.”Dave Winslow and Alex Broussard of EpikOne will teach the first three courses, where students will getting the most current information possible in the areas of: ‘Search Engine Optimization,’ ‘Google AdWords’ and ‘Web Analytics.’ These three courses begin July 5. Winslow, a Champlain alumnus, and Broussard are Google Enterprise Professional and Google Analytics Authorized Consultants.”One of the biggest challenges in e-business is staying current,” Young said. “If tomorrow Google announces a major change in its search algorithm, we are ready to include that information because current professionals and experts are teaching the course.”Starting August 28, Justin Siegel of JNJ Mobile will teach a course called ‘Social Networking’- allowing participants to explore the effectiveness of social networking as a communications vehicle. Siegel’s company develops and publishes innovative mobile entertainment and social networking applications.In October, Elaine Young of the Champlain faculty presents an ‘Online Visibility’ course while in November, Champlain faculty member Robin Lane teaches an ‘Ethical Policy Development’ course, covering privacy policies and Internet policies for staff and customers. Young has previously worked with a Web development firm and Lane was previously CEO of an Internet service provider.These one-credit ‘mini-courses’ are $420 in the summer and $440 in the fall. Group tuition discounts are available through the Champlain College Workforce Development Center at (802) 865-5402 or hersh@champlain.edu(link sends e-mail). Individuals may register through Champlain College’s Center for Online and Continuing Education at (888) 545-3459 or www.champlain.edu/coce(link is external).# # #last_img read more


Leo Schep: Ecstasy not a safe party drug

Posted On Sep 27 2020 by

first_imgNZ Herald 23 June 2015 – Dr Leo Schep is a toxicologist at the National Poisons CentreIn May 2010, 12 people attending a rave party at a venue called the Cow Palace in Daly City, California, experienced life-threatening complications requiring immediate medical attention; symptoms included seizures and hyperthermia with resultant muscle breakdown and kidney failure.Two died and four had permanent brain and muscle damage and/or kidney injury. Blood samples from those affected and confiscated tablets from the event identified Ecstasy without evidence of other recreational drugs.Ecstasy, also known as methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA, is a recreational drug that is widely used in the party scene in part because of its perceived low toxicity and its recognised euphoric properties. It is an amphetamine-like drug in the same class as methamphetamine, amphetamine and the various “bath salts”. Most of the drugs within this class cause similar adverse effects, though the intensity and risk of injury may vary.While the majority of people who use Ecstasy may not experience obvious complications, described effects that have developed after use include agitation, hallucinations, increased heart rate and high blood-pressure, clenching or grinding of the teeth, and sweating. Although these effects are transient and may not require medical attention, complications of severe toxicity have occurred; these include psychosis, seizure, hyperthermia, muscle breakdown, acute kidney failure, liver injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, cardiovascular collapse, and death. A further complication resulting from profuse sweating and excessive water consumption can lead to seizure, swelling of the brain and death.More insidious, and less obvious to the users, is the risk of changes within the brain following long-term recreational use of Ecstasy. Animal studies and investigations of human volunteers have consistently shown evidence of such changes, reflected in measurable deficits on some tests of attention, executive function and memory.Many would argue the risk of adverse events following Ecstasy use is low and, in light of other more dangerous amphetamines, it could be regarded as a legitimate alternative to other recreational drugs.http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11469393last_img read more