Update on the latest sports

Posted On Sep 18 2020 by

first_imgThe team, which is under pressure to change its name during the ongoing national reckoning over racism, said Saturday that Mitchell’s No. 49 will become only the second jersey in the franchise’s 88-year history to be retired. The other is the No. 33 of Hall of Famer Sammy Baugh.Mitchell, Washington’s first African American player, died in April. The Redskins were the last NFL team to integrate the roster.Significantly, dropping Marshall’s name from the lower bowl of the stadium follows by one day the removal of his statue at RFK Stadium, the team’s former home. Marshall moved the team from Boston to Washington and resisted integrating the roster with Black players until “forced to do so” in 1962.The team’s announcement of the change did not mention Marshall, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1963 and died in 1969. Yankees, Mets to train in New York if MLB resumesUNDATED (AP) — The Yankees and Mets would train in New York if Major League Baseball and its players try to start the coronavirus-delayed season. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Saturday, and the teams confirmed the decisions.The Yankees originally had intended to base at their spring training complex in Tampa, Florida. The Mets had said they were undecided between Citi Field and their training camp in Port St. Lucie, Florida. But positive cases for COVID-19 in Florida have increased markedly in recent days, while the percentage of positive tests in New York City has dropped sharply.All 30 MLB teams have closed their spring camps in Florida and Arizona this weekend over virus concerns.MLB had hoped to start the season during the first week of July, but teams and the players’ association are engaged in a bitter fight over how to apportion revenue losses caused by the pandemic. Both sides agree that players need three weeks of training before the increasingly slight season could start. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditHORSE RACING-BELMONTBelmont kicking off Triple Crown series(Eds: Post time is 5:42 p.m. EDT) — The NBA has firmed up the schedule for what will be a hectic time for teams this fall. The league has set Oct. 16 as the date for this year’s draft and says clubs can begin talking to free agents two days later. The annual moratorium will begin at 12:01 a.m. Eastern time on Oct. 19 and continue through noon on Oct. 23. The league told teams of the plans Saturday in a memo obtained by The Associated Press.— Kansas State has paused all voluntary workouts for football student-athletes for two weeks following the most recent COVID-19 test results. As of Friday, 14 student-athletes had tested positive for active COVID-19 following testing of more than 130 student-athletes. The school says those who tested positive are being medically managed according to current health guidelines. That includes self-isolation for 10 days and until a patient is without fever for 72 hours without medication, whichever takes longer. Athletics director Gene Taylor says the university feels that temporarily pausing all football workouts and access to facilities is the best decision for everyone. — As universities begin the process of playing sports through a pandemic, some are requiring student athletes to sign waivers acknowledging the risks for COVID-19. Ohio State and Missouri have pledges they are requiring athletes or their parents to sign before the players can take part in voluntary workouts. How much legal protection any of these forms provide schools is up for debate, along with the ethics of requiring unpaid students to sign them. Athletes have already tested positive at more than a dozen schools from Boise State to Clemson, though some schools are not releasing details.— NASCAR heads to Talladega Superspeedway this weekend with new rules and more fans. The Alabama track will admit up to 5,000 fans on Sunday, just 48 hours after Stewart-Haas Racing confirmed two of its employees tested positive for the new coronavirus. The new rules are in response to Ryan Newman’s crash in the Daytona 500, but there is no practice or qualifying scheduled, so drivers won’t have a feel for the adjustments until the race begins. NASCAR also will be on the lookout for the newly banned Confederate flag.— The NASCAR Cup race at Texas will have thousands of spectators in the stands. Texas Governor Greg Abbott has approved a comprehensive action plan submitted by the track to allow fans for the July 19 race. While the state allows 50% capacity for outdoor sporting events, track president Eddie Gossage says it’s too early to know how many fans will be able to attend. With social distancing protocols in place, the speedway first must reassign seating for people who had already purchased tickets for the race that was originally scheduled for March 29. The track capacity is about 135,000. Associated Press Update on the latest sportscenter_img June 20, 2020 In other developments related to the COVID-19 pandemic:— Three members of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers organization have tested positive for the novel coronavirus at the team’s training facility, and the team has closed affected areas of the building. Management says the affected areas will remain closed until extensive sanitizing is completed. All individuals who may have been exposed have been notified and are following the established protocols, the Bucs said in a statement. That includes a 14-day quarantine period. The team did not identify the people who tested positive. The NHL’s Tampa Bay Lightning closed their facility earlier this week after three players and two staff members tested positive.— The Toronto Maple Leafs aren’t commenting on reports that star player Auston Matthews has tested positive for the coronavirus. The Leafs say a player’s medical information is private. The Toronto Sun and The Toronto Star report that the center tested positive. According to the Sun, the 22-year-old Matthews has self-quarantined in his Arizona home and hopes to be ready to play if the NHL season resumes. The NHL hopes to open training camps next month, and finish off the 2019-20 season later this summer.— Canada’s approval of the NHL’s return-to-play proposal has led the league to consider designating one or more cities north of the border to serve as hubs for its 24-team playoff format. Officials say Canada’s top public health officer as well as the top health officers of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Toronto worked closely with the NHL to approve the plan. It required an exemption because the U.S.-Canada border is currently closed to all non-essential travel until at least July 21 and those who enter Canada must self-isolate for 14 days.— Five-time PGA Tour winner Nick Watney tested positive Friday for the coronavirus, the first player with a confirmed infection since golf resumed its schedule last week. Watney withdrew immediately from the RBC Heritage and must self-isolate for at least 10 days under the PGA Tour’s protocols. The tour began its phase of contact tracing and identified 11 people who were tested Friday evening. All results came back negative. Secondary tests were given, and those results were not expected before Saturday night. ELMONT, N.Y. (AP) — Tiz the Law is the star of a 10-horse field for the Belmont Stakes, perhaps the biggest event in U.S. sports since the coronavirus pandemic shut down competition in mid-March. The 3-year-old colt is the early 6-5 favorite for Saturday’s race.No fans or owners will be at the New York track for the $1 million race that is being run at a shorter distance this year. This Belmont — rescheduled from June 6 — will be run at 1 1/8 miles, the first time since 1925 it won’t be its usual grueling 1 1/2 miles. The top four finishers earn Kentucky Derby qualifying points, including 150 to the winner.Tiz the Law is the only horse in the race with Grade 1 stakes victories. He’ll try to buck history as the first New York-bred in 138 years to win the $1 million race. His 82-year-old trainer, Barclay Tagg, is chasing a win that eluded him in 2003 after Funny Cide won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness only to lose his Triple Crown bid in the Belmont.The Belmont is kicking off the Triple Crown series for the first time, instead of completing the series of three races run over five weeks. The Kentucky Derby follows on Sept. 5, with the Preakness finishing up on Oct. 3.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS — The Chinese basketball league has restarted after an almost five-month shutdown for the coronavirus pandemic but is going ahead in empty stadiums and with fewer foreign players. The CBA was suspended on Jan. 24 after the virus outbreak in Wuhan. The semifinals stage has started with 20 teams divided into two divisions and limited venues to reduce travel. All stadiums are closed to fans. League chairman and former NBA star Yao Ming praised the work of the clubs and health authorities for helping get the season restarted. He says as the first national large-scale sports event to be restarted in China the CBA is of “strategic significance.”— French soccer authorities will allow fans back into stadiums starting July 10, with an initial limit of 5,000. The president of the French Football Federation says it is possible more spectators will be allowed into the French Cup final at the end of July and for the resumption of top-tier Ligue 1 play at the end of August. The French government called off the country’s 2019-20 soccer season on April 28 as part of efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic.NFL-REDSKINS-HONORING MITCHELLRedskins retire Mitchell’s jersey, rename stadium levelUNDATED (AP) — The Washington Redskins will retire the jersey of Hall of Famer Bobby Mitchell. They will also rename the lower level of FedEx Field for him, replacing the section named for former owner George Preston Marshall.last_img read more


’SC’s Star Seniors: Q&A with Jackie Gilbert

Posted On Sep 16 2020 by

first_imgQ: What have you had to sacrifice in order to be a student-athlete? Q: What is your schedule like? Q: What is it like to be part of a relatively new program? It’s [fun] to be part of a program that’s still growing and new. I was blessed to be part of the freshman class that still had that first senior class to come in. I got to see the process they went through, what they had worked through, and now, you go full circle to a new and different team. But each group that I was with has brought something different. This team has grown so much, and there’s been so many great times and great years. My freshman and sophomore years, we were really top. We had a little bit of a growing year last year. Again, this year, we’ve come back strong and [have] all come together. It’s  exciting to see the up-and-downs and now to be on the road to success, [to] be in a group that’s been doing well. It’s a lot of memories all together. There’s been so many things with my team, and all these experiences we have to go through are unique. Things like travel trips are really special to being a student-athlete and things that you can’t get back. I don’t have a specific memory that stands out, but being with my team, being in the locker room, just hanging out. Being down the street from one of my friends and being able to hit them up and go get lunch — those are the things that I am going to miss most when I graduate. It’s much harder in the real world to be able to hang out with your friends. I think it’s just the college experience. I’m sure I haven’t been perfect, but anything I haven’t done right, I’ve been happy for messing up and whatnot. All those lessons that I’ve learned have somehow helped me [later on]. For the most part, I’ve tried my best to squeeze USC in school and service and lacrosse, [to] try to get the most out of it possible. I’m happy with mistakes I have made because I’ve learned a lot from [them], so no huge regrets off the top of my mind. Q: Do you have any regrets from the past four years? My strongest advice when it specifically comes to athletics is to learn to go with the punches. There’s going to be a lot of conflicts, there’s going to be a lot of things that are going to come with being a student athlete, but learning how to take it and go with it and not sit in the moment and complain about it — that’s a big learning curve. That’s going to stop you a little bit from being successful. That’s something that every freshman has to learn. There’s a lot on your plate. For many college students, four years of school can seem to fly by quickly. For student-athletes, grueling workouts, travel and the rigors of competing at the Division I level can make it go by even quicker. In this series, the Daily Trojan sits down with senior athletes playing various sports at USC to discuss their experience over the past four years, from their athletic life to their academic life. This week’s senior is women’s lacrosse defender Jackie Gilbert, a team captain who made last year’s Pac-12 All-Conference First Team. We have our practice block from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Since I’m a senior, my classload isn’t crazy schedule-wise. In previous years, there would usually be class afterward from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., and at 6 p.m., you’re usually studying and doing homework. If you’re traveling, you’re trying to fit in homework and all that, which is usually the hardest. It’s all about prioritizing and trying to get stuff done right away. It’s a lot, but it’s well worth it. Q: What is your favorite memory at USC?center_img We do have to sacrifice a lot, especially if you want to be a top student, too. That’s the hardest balance — being able to have fun and have time with your friends as well as be a top student athlete and a top student. You’re going to have to lose something between there — not be able to go out as much and stuff like that. It’s all about balance. It’s all about knowing what areas are you strong in, when can you have fun? It’s a lot of learning. For the most part, I enjoy it. I enjoy the nature of having to juggle things. If anything, I’d find it harder if I had more time. I’ve appreciated being a student-athlete because it’s made it personally easier. The more things I have, I’m probably more organized. Q: What’s one thing about lacrosse that most people don’t know? Q: What’s next for you? Q: Do you have any advice for freshman athletes? I’m a real estate major and business minor, so afterward I’m working at a company called Eastdil Secured, which does real estate investment sales and investment banking. I hope to try to continue professional lacrosse, if I can do it with my job. But the good thing about our team and culture is everyone really appreciates each other. Our defensive unit is super close. When someone does something that maybe the crowd doesn’t notice, we know and we appreciate it. The game of lacrosse – the intricate details – are something that is still expanding on the west coast. Michelle Mankoff/Daily Trojan There’s probably a lot of things people don’t know. On the west coast, you still get asked, ‘What is lacrosse?’ and whatnot. Things that people don’t know about lacrosse are things that are more intricate to the game and what it takes to be a really good player and especially a defender. It is growing a lot. I’m from the Bay Area. I’ve been here through the growing of lacrosse from when I started in middle school to where it is now. It’s gaining a lot more popularity. I see more and more people out at middle schools playing it. There’s more and more recognition on the west coast. More and more people are getting to know about it, which is really exciting.last_img read more


Tipp school hoping for Munster glory

Posted On Sep 9 2020 by

first_imgThe Premier County face Laois.Throw-in at the Laois Training Centre is at 2 o’clock. The Tipperary school are taking on Scoil Phobal Rathmore in the final of the Munster B football competition.The match, which starts at 12.30pm, is being played in Ballygiblin near Mallow in County Cork.Meanwhile, Tipperary are in action in the 2nd Round of the Peter McNulty U21 football tournment this afternoon.last_img