Pizzeria owner who blew stolen €16,000 on gambling escapes jail

Posted On Dec 21 2019 by

first_imgA pizzeria owner who stole more than €16,000 from his ex-girlfriend and bet the cash on two horses has escaped going to prison.Raul Andrei spent more than €70,000 opening up a franchise of Apache Pizza in Letterkenny, which he operated successfully for a number of months. However, Letterkenny District Court heard the 46-year-old developed a gambling habit after visiting a local casino.On October 14th last year while his partner was visiting friends in Dublin he gained access to the former house he shared with Oana Grigore at The Green, Ballymacool, Letterkenny.He stole the money and then went to his local branch of BoyleSport Bookmakers.He placed €10,000 on one horse and €6,720 on another on two different horses at two different race meetings but both lost.The court heard Andrei lost a considerable amount of money the previous day and was trying to win the money back.The accused told a friend that he had lost the money and was feeling suicidal and also telephoned his ex-partner and told her what had happened.The stolen money had come from the business and he had given it to his ex-partner but she had hidden the money as she was aware of the accused man’s gambling habit.Andrei was very remorseful and attended Gambler’s Anonymous and was also attending church meetings and no longer gambles.The couple have one child together and Andrei still pays his child’s creche fees and sees the child regularly.The court heard that the accused, of Sprackburn House, Letterkenny, is now working with a local company, earns €600 per week and is anxious to pay the money back to his ex-partner.The 47 year old no longer works at the pizza restaurant.At a previous sitting Judge Paul Kelly adjourned the case for a probation and community service report and also a to get a victim impact statement.He also ordered Andrei to pay back the money to his ex-partner.The court was told today (Mon) that Andrei has so far paid back €1,400 and continues to support his child and makes regular payments.Passing sentence Judge Kelly said this was a “serious theft and a serious breach of trust.”However, he added that the victim had been very compassionate towards her ex-partner and that the amount of cash taken warranted a custodial sentence.Because of the victim’s compassion and his co-operation he was not sending him to jail and ordered him to complete 180 hours community service for the of €10,000 in lieu of six months in jail and a further 180 hours for the theft of €6,720 in lieu of another six months in jail.Pizzeria owner who blew stolen €16,000 on gambling escapes jail was last modified: November 26th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Andreigamblingletterkennypizzeriastolenlast_img read more


Developers Are Pissed, Frustrated by New Twitter Decree

Posted On Dec 15 2019 by

first_imgadam popescu Tags:#twitter#web A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Claiming a desire to deliver “a more consistent Twitter experience,” today the San Francisco company announced a laundry list of changes, many of them vague, to how developers can access tweets, prompting outrage, confusion and frustration from the third party developers who piggyback on the microblogging site’s ecosystem. Many view the change as the latest move from the company towards tightening its grip and owning the platform, a move that will eventually choke out and steer users to only use Twitter’s own apps. The days of popular third-party services like Tweetbot and Echofon may be numbered. For others, it means manpower and time in order to change. Alex Benzer, the founder and chief executive of PHP social network software maker SocialEngine, and social inbox site FanMix isn’t looking forward to the changes. “It’s going to require energy and it’s not ideal,” Benzer said. “We’re going to have to register for an API key which isn’t that big of a deal, but we’re going to have to make it work.”Benzer said he’s more concerned about his FanMix site, a Gmail like service for social networks, collecting all your social conversations and email, into one unified inbox. Right now FanMix users can sign in with their Twitter accounts, which uses Twitter’s API.“Basically it (FanMix) pulls in all your tweets and mentions of you and displays them,” he said. Today’s move by Twitter threatens that model. “It’s obviously a move for a more restrictive API,” he said. Today’s move will stop public developers from writing script that gets data from Twitter. “That signals a shift in the company’s direction. The general feeling is that they want people to use Twitter and not apps built on Twitter.”Bottlenose CEO Nova Spivack took to Twitter to vent this afternoon. He swayed from angry to acceptance and back again, seemingly by the minute. Not long after that tweet, he wrote “Information wants to be free. Twitter is going against the tide. The music industry couldn’t stop it from happening. How will Twitter?”Brian Norgard, the founder of social video site Chill sees today’s move as the logical step in Twitter’s move towards owning the field. He says the writing on the wall was clear to see, several months ago. Twitter has gone from being a toy, to being one of the most powerful media companies on the planet, he said.“You’re dancing with the devil when you’re building on top of another platform,” said Norgard. He thinks the move was done to maintain control. “If you’re going to do something core, like reading tweets, Twitter is going to probably want to control that aspect of the business.”Norgard says his site won’t be affected, but says “I feel for a lot of developers.”Still, he tempered that by saying the changes have happened before and will happen again, citing Photobucket building on the back of Myspace. “Twitter’s not the first, won’t be the last.”center_img Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…last_img read more


Free HD Stock Video: Smoke Effects

Posted On Dec 12 2019 by

first_imgAdd smoke to your video footage with these free stock video clips — perfect for trailers, video opens, or logo reveals!Shot on a RED EPIC and captured at 4K resolution, these high-quality shots are great to have in your own stock video library. Philadelphia-based director of photography Mitch Martinez is offering 40 unique smoke stock video shots, from thick walls of smoke to thin smoke streams.These stock video clips could serve a variety of uses in your video projects — composite them into the shot for pro VFX or use them to set a mood in a a film/video intro. Stripping out the black background in the shots is easy by applying a Screen blending mode or a simple Luma key (standard effects in most video editing and motion graphics apps).Many thanks to Mitch for offering up these high quality smoke stock video shots! Download the free clips on his site. Here are a few previews of what you can get!Thin Smoke Stock Video: 90 secondsSmoke Stock Video: 65 secondsSmoke Stock Video : 23 secondsThin Smoke Stock Video: 30 seconds Looking for more smoke effects? Check out the Fume Smoke Effects Library at RocketStock.last_img read more


Industry Insights with Cinematographer Michael Franks

Posted On Dec 12 2019 by

first_imgPremiumBeat stepped behind the lens with cinematographer Michael Franks to discuss his insight on technology, and how to create the cinematic look.Whether it’s lighting mountain ranges, live sketch comedy, or Disney favorites, Michael Franks approaches each project with a fresh mind and an eye for story.Hannah Montana (Buena Vista Television).PremiumBeat: Michael, you’ve worked on some of the most iconic Disney shows, including Jessie, Hannah Montana, and That’s So Raven. Is there a Disney “look,” or have you found each show was approached differently?Michael Franks: I have worked on a variety of projects for Disney, Nickelodeon, Amazon, and other networks. I enjoy approaching each project with an open mind, discovering what the needs of the show are, and how we might best serve them. Each show presents unique opportunities for me to create a specific look for that project. The costumes, production design, in addition to the lighting approach, and camera and lens choices all affect the final look of the show. It’s a collaboration, and we discover together what the look will be.PB: You’ve won two consecutive Emmy Awards for lighting ESPN’s Summer and Winter X Games, what goes into creating the look of the live coverage?MF: The X Games I got to work on from the 1st Winter Games in Big Bear, and then the 2nd Summer Games in San Diego — starting in 1997. My involvement grew over the years. It started with creating the look for the host areas that were quite extensive in the early X Games, and then my work grew from there.One of the largest undertakings was when I suggested we light the backgrounds for the night coverage for the Winter X Games in Aspen. There was no inherent night lighting for Aspen mountain. So, with my team, we devised a comprehensive plan to light the mountain, the tree lines, and put color behind the on-camera talent. Much of the background just showed up as black on camera, previously.This proved to be more challenging than we thought! Trees that looked twenty-feet tall in our survey photos turned out to be 300-feet tall, and lighting the backgrounds meant dragging cable, lights, and other equipment — with snowmobiles — for thousands of feet! In the end, it was worth it though. The producers were happy, and we continued to do that for a few years at the Aspen Winter X Games.Michael Franks. All That (Nickelodeon Network).PB: As cinematographer of Nickelodeon’s All That, what challenges do you face in filming fast-paced, high-standard sketch comedy?MF: My time on SNL really served me well with the reboot of All That. With All That, one of the things we must be is flexible, spontaneous, fast, and good! I think that’s one of the things I find most appealing (as I did with SNL) is working under a very tight schedule. It pushes our creativity to come up with ideas and solutions we might not think of otherwise. On a weekly basis, we are lighting sometimes eight to ten new sets (we counted over seventy-two sets we lit over a ten-week schedule). Some sets are set up overnight Thursday, and we light and shoot them on Friday. It’s an intense schedule, but I find it appealing. I couldn’t do it without a great crew, which I feel lucky to have. These women and men . . . I get to work with each week, are absolutely fantastic.One of the other challenges is to give the show a high-quality look, given the time frame. I was asked to give the show an “upgraded” look. We work very hard to give each sketch a look and feel that’s specific for the sketch, and we resist lighting the show in a formulaic manner. Sometimes, as with the movie A Silent Place, which was a spoof of the movie A Quiet Place, we got to do a very specific and dramatic look. I was asked by the director, Jonathan Judge (who I enjoy collaborating with), to create a single-camera look, and he had planned very specific camera angles that we could light to. This was a lot of fun to create something unusual, while working within the time constraints of having actors that are minors in a multi-camera schedule.We use a lot of the new technology that’s available to us now, which helps us with the process of being nimble, while creating the extremely varied looks we are asked to create. We utilize the latest automated lights for our music segments and wireless LEDs, as well as conventional equipment for our sketches. It’s a great time to be working — the technology in both camera and lighting has come such a long way. We have the tools now to create bold, interesting looks that were much more difficult and time-consuming to create in the past.Sigmund and the Sea Monsters (Amazon Studios).PB: Amazon’s Sigmund and the Sea Monsters is a re-imaging of the 1973 original children’s hit show. Were you mindful of the look of the original, or were the storytellers interested in an updated, modern feel?MF: For Sigmund and the Sea Monsters, I was asked to create a wholly different look than that of the original. Amazon set the bar high, and I was asked to create a “feature-quality look” that was much more cinematic than what was done originally. I, again, got to collaborate with Jonathan Judge to create the new look for the current version. We shot the show single-camera on the ARRI ALEXA, and created sets on location for the pilot and onstage for the series.We were conscious to create a look that was current, as well as paying homage to the original. We wanted the environment to feel like we’re in a real place, where these sea monsters then inhabit. We were thrilled that Amazon liked what we did in the pilot, and then picked up six more episodes. It was a lot of fun to shoot this series.Michael Franks. All That (Nickelodeon Network).PB: Any general or specific advice you’d give a young cinematographer when navigating the work or the business?MF: Never stop learning, and be kind. Technology continues to advance, and it’s important for the cinematographer to know what tools are available to them, but the aesthetic is what’s important. The technology is there for us to utilize to create the vision.I also think it’s important to be kind and help each other grow and move forward. It’s a unique business because it’s a craft that I feel needs to be learned and shared. But, it can be a cutthroat business too, and we can easily lose the human kindness in that. I like what Steve Jobs said, “Stay hungry, stay foolish.” Don’t lose sight of why you want to do this work!Cover image via Amazon Studios.Looking for more industry interviews? Check these out.Industry Insights: The Man in the High Castle’s Cinematographer Gonzalo AmatInterview: Composer Chad Cannon on the Obamas’ Higher GroundIndustry Insights: “Better Call Saul” Production Designer Judy RheeComposer David Schwartz on VEEP, The Good Place and Arrested DevelopmentThe Editor of “Us” on Working with Jordan Peele and the Horror Genrelast_img read more


CWG action on Day 12

Posted On Nov 28 2019 by

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