PART-TIME TEACHER WHO COULDN’T AFFORD CAR INSURANCE IS FINED

Posted On Dec 28 2019 by

first_imgA teacher on part-time hours has told a judge he couldn’t afford rising car insurance prices – and had driven without cover.Christopher Carr, who is 29 and from Meadow Hill in Letterkenny appeared before the district court.Asked by Judge Paul Kelly why he hadn’t insured his vehicle, Mr Carr said he couldn’t afford it. “The car is over 10 years old and there was no way I could afford to pay for the insurance in full,” said the teacher.“I’m a teacher on part-time hours. I did have a policy which was costing €200 per month but I couldn’t afford to keep up the payments.”Judge Kelly said his situation was unfortunate but that every motorist has to have insurance.He fined Carr €200 and gave him four months to pay for the incident at Gortlee in Letterkenny on December 8 last.PART-TIME TEACHER WHO COULDN’T AFFORD CAR INSURANCE IS FINED was last modified: May 30th, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


SA banks on competitiveness

Posted On Dec 18 2019 by

first_img19 October 2009 South Africa is ranked 45th out of 134 countries in the World Economic Forum’s recently released Global Competitiveness Index for 2009/10. While this is the same position it held in 2008/09, the country’s banking system soared in the rankings, from 24th to fifth in the world. Conducted by the World Economic Forum (WEF) in partnership with leading academics and a global network of research institutes, the index calculates its rankings from publicly available data and an annual poll of over 12 000 business leaders worldwide. The index is based on 12 “pillars of competitiveness”, namely: institutions; infrastructure; macroeconomic stability; health and primary education; higher education and training; goods market efficiency; labour market efficiency; financial market sophistication; technological readiness; market size; business sophistication; and innovation. At 45th overall, South Africa remains the highest ranked country in sub-Saharan Africa in 2009/10, with what the WEF describes as “a stable performance compared with last year. “The country continues to benefit from the large size of its economy, particularly by regional standards (it is ranked 24th in the market size pillar).”‘Strong confidence in SA’s financial markets’ South Africa’s jump to 5th place overall for its banking system indicates “strong confidence in South Africa’s financial markets at a time when trust has been eroded in many other parts of the world,” the WEF says. South Africa also does well on such measures as intellectual property protection (24th place overall), accountability of private institutions (5th), and goods market efficiency (35th). The country does “reasonably well” on more complex measures, such as business sophistication (36th place) and innovation (41st), where it benefited from good scientific research institutions (ranked 29th) and strong collaboration between universities and the business sector in innovation (ranked 25th). At the same time, the WEF says, South Africa’s competitiveness would be enhanced by tackling “some enduring weaknesses”.Labour market inefficiency Chief among these is the country’s labour market efficiency, for which it ranks 90th, dragged down by inflexible hiring and firing practices (125th place), lack of flexibility in wage determination by companies (123rd), and poor labour-employer relations (121st). A university enrollment rate of only 15 percent (94th place) threatens to undermine SA’s innovative potential, says the WEF. And South Africa’s infrastructure (45th place), although good by regional standards, requires upgrading. “In this light, the improvements in transport infrastructure related to the 2010 World Cup is a welcome development that should reinforce South Africa’s competitiveness.” Other important obstacles to doing business in South Africa, says the WEF, is the “poor security situation. “The business costs of crime and violence (133rd place) and the sense that the police are unable to provide protection from crime (106th) do not contribute to an environment that fosters competitiveness.” Another major concern remains the health of South Africa’s workforce (127th place), the result of “high rates of communicable diseases and poor health indicators more generally.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more


SANParks sells rhinos to foil poachers

Posted On Dec 18 2019 by

first_img2 April 2015SANParks is to sell 286 white rhino to private buyers as part of its efforts to save the animals from poaching, Kuseni Dlamini, the organisation’s outgoing chairperson, said in Pretoria on Wednesday.“A tender was issued for the sale of white rhino to private land owners who fulfil a number of requirements, including habit and security,” Dlamini said.Poachers killed 1 217 rhinos in South Africa in 2014, including more than 800 in Kruger National Park, up from a total of 1 004 in 2013. The country has a population of about 20 000 rhinos.Suitable and secureDlamini said the tender process was in the adjudication phase, with a team including auditors from KPMG, National Treasury and scientists assessing properties to ensure they would provide a suitable and secure habitat.The sale forms part of a translocation programme begun in October 2014 to move some rhino out of poaching hotspots in the Kruger National Park.About R32-million of land had also been purchased as part of the creation of “rhino strongholds” where rhinos would be kept to allow the population to grow, SANParks said.Dr Howard Hendricks, SANParks acting managing executive for conservation, said the rhino would not be “dumped” on to the properties, and that the organisation would maintain relationships with the owners.Interventions“While we cannot claim to have won the war against rhino poaching during our term, we have gone a long way towards developing and putting in place the interventions needed to contain this threat to our natural heritage,” Dlamini said.Steps included a helicopter donated by the Howard G Buffett Foundation and use of unmanned aerial vehicles or drones in the Kruger National Park.Ending poaching needed the combined effort of business, NGOs, neighbouring countries and the “whole global community”, he said.Hendricks said rhinos were also being killed by lightning, which had become more prevalent in the past three years.In Bloemhof in Free State, two rhino were killed by lightning last year. Other areas where this had happened were the Northern Cape and the Waterberg region in Limpopo.news24.com and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more


Now is not the time to relax for cattle producers

Posted On Dec 17 2019 by

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest April is an exciting time of the year for cow-calf producers. The 2017 calf crop is taking shape and breeding season is currently or soon will be underway  We have begun to emerge from the doldrums of winter to the warmth and new growth of spring. The drudgery of feeding hay to the herd is coming to an end as pastures begin their early spring flush of growth. It is certainly a great feeling to see cow-calf pairs turned out to fresh pastures for the first grazing of the season.NutritionHowever, this is not necessarily a time for the cow-calf to relax and take for granted that the nutritional needs of the breeding herd are being met. In fact, this may be the most critical time of the year for producers to focus on the needs of the herd. This is especially true for yearling heifers and two-year-olds nursing their first calves.Think about the change in environment that the breeding herd is going through at this time. Typically, beef herds have been fed ample supplies of dried, harvested forages of variable quality (some good, some not so good) for the past 4 to 5 months. Cows consuming average quality forage during this time will potentially consume 2.2% to 2.5% of their body weight in forage dry matter intake. Females are now starting to graze forages that will typically be consumed at 2.5% to 2.7% of their body weight. Given that these forages currently may have a dry matter content of only 15% to 30%, females may not be physically able to eat enough to meet their dietary needs.The transition from a drylot situation to fresh pasture can be troublesome for yearling heifers and young lactating cows. Several research studies conducted at different universities showed that heifers and cows that were not supplemented when turned out on early season pasture saw weight loss and significantly lower pregnancy rates early in the breeding season compared to females that were supplemented.Early season pasture is generally higher in protein and lacking in energy.  Any supplemental feed offered to females in this situation should be higher in energy content.  Once the typical beef female gets a taste of lush pasture, it will be difficult to persuade her to eat any significant amount of dry hay. Consider offering a feed such as corn or soybean hulls to add energy to the diet.  This should help the beef female to maintain body condition and positively impact reproduction rates.Culling CriteriaThe spring is a good time for the producer to make certain evaluations of the beef herd to help make culling decisions. One of the obvious culling decisions that should be made immediately relates to pregnancy status. Far too many producers do not utilize palpation, ultrasound, or blood testing to determine pregnancy status at the conclusion of the breeding season.  Discovering that a female is open during the following calving season is an expensive proposition. Do not perpetuate problem by trying to breed the open female again. Even if you get her bred again, she will accumulate two years of expenses between calves and will be nearly impossible for her to be profitable in her lifetime.An additional criteria to be examined when culling cows is udder quality. Udder quality is not just a consideration for dairy producers. Udder issues can impact cow productivity and can create extra management issues for the producer. Several beef breed associations have developed evaluation systems for udder soundness. Teat size and shape as well as udder suspension are the primary characteristics evaluated. Make notes on cows with problem udders early in their lactation for future culling purposes.Calving and breeding season is certainly an excellent time to evaluate the disposition of females in the herd. Calving time will bring out maternal behaviors but they must not be tolerated to the point that the producer is at risk. Observe the disposition of animals in the herd when doing any spring herd work or breeding season activities. Given the advanced age of the average beef producer, it appears that disposition of the beef animal is becoming a higher priority selection trait.Spring is certainly an exciting time of year for the cow-calf producer.  It is a time when many important management decisions can be made to impact future profitability of the herd. Take time this spring to evaluate the herd to improve your bottom line.last_img read more


Floods ravage western Maharashtra, over 1.32 lakh evacuated from 5 districts

Posted On Dec 1 2019 by

first_imgOver a lakh people from 20,000 families have been moved to safety as local residents, the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF), and the Armed forces are pulling out all the stops to rescue those stuck in water-logged areas in Kolhapur and Sangli districts.The districts are experiencing the worst deluge since 2005.Sixteen people in five districts — Pune, Kolhapur, Satara, Sangli and Solapur — in western Maharashtra have lost their lives over the past week. Around 1.32 lakh people from these districts have been evacuated till Wednesday, Pune Divisional Commissioner Deepak Mhaisekar said.Chairing an emergency meeting in Mumbai, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said rescuing women, children and patients was the priority, and directed the administration of the flood-hit districts to make alternative arrangements for food, essential items, and drinking water.Mr. Mhaisekar said four teams of the Territorial Army are engaged in rescue operations in Kolhapur and one team has reached Sangli. While six NDRF teams are already in action in Kolhapur, six more are on their way by road. One Navy team is in operation in Kolhapur.“Air connectivity has been established over Kolhapur since Wednesday morning with five more Navy teams to be dispatched via air over the district,” he said. The deluge has completely thrown State Transport bus services in Kolhapur and Sangli out of gear. With 89 roads in Kolhapur under water, the district is completely cut off from the rest of Maharashtra.The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has forecast heavy rain for Kolhapur in the next 48 hours.“From Wednesday night till forenoon of August 9, we expect heavy to very heavy showers to hit the ghat areas, including Kolhapur,” Anupam Kashyapi, head, weather and air pollution monitoring unit, IMD, said.last_img read more