Laura Bell Bundy, Gavin Creel & Eden Espinosa Wish You a Merry, Merry Christmas

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img Star Files View Comments It’s the most wonderful time of the year: when Broadway stars fill the streets of New York singing Christmas carols and raid the Steinway & Sons on Sixth Ave. Tony nominee Laura Bell Bundy joined forces with her Broadway buddies Eden Espinosa and The Book of Mormon’s Gavin Creel for a special holiday edition of Broadway Bus Stop. The three stars ice skate, guzzle Starbucks and somehow manage to seamlessly weave through Midtown during the holiday season (a Christmas miracle), all while singing “Carol of the Bells.” Take a look below, and check out more from Bundy on her new YouTube channel Skitsofrenic!center_img Gavin Creellast_img


Disaster!’s Jennifer Simard is Broadway.com’s Next Vlogger

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img Disaster! Show Closed This production ended its run on May 8, 2016 This is not a test. We repeat: This is not a test. Disaster!’s Jennifer Simard will grab a camera as Broadway.com’s latest video blogger. Keep watch for Help! Backstage at Disaster! with Jennifer Simard.Simard, who plays Sister Mary in the jukebox musical, will show us around the hallowed halls of the Nederlander Theatre, where she and her co-stars—including Adam Pascal, Kerry Butler, Roger Bart and Faith Prince—jump ship, do the Hustle and rock some serious black tie (or, if you’re Simard, a nun’s habit). We would like to request that she cameo her Bernadette Peters impression at least once.Simard returns to Disaster! after appearing in the show off-Broadway. Her additional credits include Sister Act, Shrek and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee on Broadway, as well as Forbidden Broadway, Unbroken Circle and I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change off-Broadway.Help! will premiere on February 17 and run every Wednesday for eight weeks. Jennifer Simard in ‘Disaster!'(Photo by Andrew Eccles) Star Filescenter_img Related Shows View Comments Jennifer Simardlast_img read more


Bright Star Standout A.J. Shively on Loving Aliens, Stephen King, Ice-Cream & Texting Grandma

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:42Loaded: 0.00%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -2:42 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 26, 2016 Related Shows View Comments Star Filescenter_img Bright Star A.J. Shively Age: 29Hometown: Dublin, OhioCurrent Role: Playing optimistic Billy Cane, a returning WWII soldier and aspiring writer in Steve Martin and Edie Brickell’s Bright Star.Stage & Screen Cred: Shively made his Broadway in La Cage Aux Folles. His other stage credits include the national tour of The Sound of Music, off-Broadway’s February House, Unlocked and more. His screen credits include Syrup, HairBrained, Nobody Walks in L.A. and From Nowhere.last_img read more


Nominate Your Faves for the 2016 Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards!

Posted On Jan 18 2021 by

first_img View Comments Awards season is in full swing on the Great White Way, and that means it’s time to rise up and determine the best shows and performers of the year. That’s right: It’s up to you to pick the nominations for the 2016 Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards.It’s the biggest theatrical award chosen exclusively by the fans, and the process is easy. Click here to access the online ballot and choose your top five in each of the 22 competitive categories. If you don’t see your favorite, write it in!Polls close at 11:00AM on Friday, April 29. Nominees will be announced live that day at noon. Be sure to check back then and place your final vote to pick the winners!CLICK HERE TO VOTE!last_img


Costly Irragation Lapses.

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_img PUMPING WATER AS FAST AS THEY CAN, many Georgia irrigation systems can’t keep up with plants’ water needs. Underdesigned systems or hesitant farmers supplement rain, instead of replace it, as irrigation systems are engineered to do. But using it to supplement rain means lost yields, said a University of Georgia engineer. “You have to be committed to supplying the moisture needs of the crop,” said Tony Tyson. “Sometimes that means irrigating 24 hours a day. But you have to do it.” (Photo courtesy the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Kerry Harrison — UGA CAES “For the most part, people have drawn that conclusion from past experience,”said Tyson, an irrigation specialist. “But either their system was underdesigned orthe farmer was hesitant to run it long enough to supply the peak water demand.”Usually, the problem isn’t the system. “Most systems less than 10 years old areadequately designed,” he said.The problem, he said, is that many Georgia farmers use supplemental irrigation. Theyjust fill in between rains. When their crop shows signs of moisture stress, they crank upthe irrigation.That approach is costly, he said, in years like this, when dry spells are long andtemperatures high.”If you wait until you see signs of stress, you’ve already hurt the yieldpotential,” he said. “That’s especially true in the critical pollinating andfruiting period.”Losing any yield is costly. Georgia growers get up to 1,400 pounds of cotton fromirrigated fields. A loss of 230 pounds per acre would mean about $100 million overGeorgia’s 600,000 acres of irrigated cotton.The Georgia Agricultural Statistics Servicerates 73 percent of Georgia’s 1.4 million acres of cotton as only “fair” orworse. About 40 percent is irrigated.Tyson figures most yield losses on irrigated acres could be avoided if the systems weredesigned and used right.”We recommend designs that will meet peak demand,” he said. “That meansthat with no rainfall at all, the system will supply the highest demand of a givencrop.”With most row crops, he said, the system must provide up to one and one-quarter inchesof water every three days.Some systems can’t meet that demand. “In the late 1970s and early ’80s,irresponsible or inexperienced irrigation contractors sometimes cut the system capacity tocome up with a competitive price,” he said. “Some of those systems can’t put outenough water in conditions like this.”Some farmers irrigate out of ponds they have already pumped dry. But Tyson said thatshouldn’t happen.”That’s one of the things we look at in the design,” he said. “It’s hardto justify making the kind of investment you have to make on irrigation if you don’t haveadequate water.”Some strategies, though, avoid problems even with underdesigned systems. “Werecommend splitting the system,” he said, “and planting different crops underthem that don’t require peak irrigation at the same time.”Most crops have a water-use curve, he said, that ranges from less than one-tenth toabout one-third of an inch per day. The peak water demand for corn and tobacco is in Mayand June. For cotton and peanuts, it’s July and August.Most farmers, though, have systems that can put out plenty of water. But for variousreasons, they hesitate until they’ve already lost valuable yields.”Some of our farmers do a good job with irrigation management,” Tyson said.”I can just about guarantee you somebody will make 1,400 pounds of cotton per acreeven this year.”The ones who manage their irrigation well, he said, are committed to supplying waterwhenever their crops need it.”You’re not going to make peak yields with supplemental irrigation in stressfulconditions,” Tyson said. “You have to be committed to supplying the moistureneeds of the crop. Sometimes that means irrigating 24 hours a day. But you have to doit.”center_img It’s not just the drought hurting Georgia farmers this year. A University of Georgia expert said the way many water theircrops could cut $100 million from cotton yields alone.Struggling to keep their crops healthy, Georgia farmers often declare that even inirrigated fields, they need rain to get good yields.But that’s not necessarily true, said Tony Tyson,an Extension Service engineer with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more


Y2K Finances

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_img Checking and savings account statements. Loan and repayment schedules (including credit cards) and payment receipts. “. . . You need to keep good records all the time, not just because you’re worried about the Y2K ‘bug.'” Esther Maddux, UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences FDIC Federal Trade Commission Department of Commerce Investment account statements. With these records, if problems do occur, you’ll be able to straighten them out quickly. For further peace of mind, the Federal Trade Commission offers these precautions to ease your way into the next millennium. For more information about Y2K and your finances, visit these sites on the World Wide Web: Computer experts have been working hard to make sure nothing will happen to your bank accounts on Jan. 1, 2000, said a University of Georgia specialist. You need not worry. “There are some end-of-year statements and paperwork to collect,” said Esther Maddux, an Extension Service financial specialist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “But you need to keep good records all the time, not just because you’re worried about the Y2K ‘bug.'” Banking and financial institutions began preparation for the 1999-2000 rollover severalyears ago. So their systems are either compliant or are scheduled to be compliant before the newyear. “The banks are ready,” Maddux said. “So banking customers just need to collect recordsthey normally would at the end of the year.” Maddux recommends you have three to six months’ worth of these records at the end of the year.center_img Social Security Administration Ask your financial service provider how it is dealing with the rollover. If you’re not comfortable with the response, consider doing business elsewhere. Some people plan to have a little extra cash on hand near the new year, just in case. But remember, cash can easily be lost or stolen. Banking experts say any funds in FDIC-insured accounts are safe, no matter what happens to the computers. In a recent on-line interview, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation chairman Donna Tanoue said, “FDIC-insured deposits are safe, just as they always have been. The FDIC’s protection of insured deposits will not be affected by the year 2000.” Ask what type of backup records are kept in case of an emergency. How would these records be used to identify and correct problems affecting your deposit, loan, or other account? Get a copy of your credit report from one of the three major credit bureaus — Equifax (800-685-1111), Experian (800-682-7654) or TransUnion (800-916-8800) — before and after Jan. 1, 2000. You may be charged up to $8 for your report. Check for errors and report them to the credit bureau. last_img read more


Floppy Plants.

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_img Walter Reeves UGA CAES File Photo On “Gardening in Georgia” this week, host Walter Reeves shows how he handles those floppy plants that can be a continuing garden problem.Reeves details how he made two forms to bend inexpensive wire and rod to make plant supports just as good as the costly ones in the garden store.”Gardening in Georgia” will air Wednesday, Aug. 22, at 7:30 p.m. and will be rebroadcast Saturday, Aug. 25, at 12:30 p.m. on Georgia Public Television.On this week’s show, Reeves takes us to the Center for Applied Nursery Research, which works at breeding and testing new plants for Georgia. Kay Bowman describes her research on breeding a better hypericum (St. John’s wort), using pollen from plants having different blooms and shapes.Margaret Mosley’s GardenCo-host Tara Dillard takes viewers on a visit to long-time gardener Margaret Mosley’s wonderland. Gardening in the shade isn’t a contradiction for Margaret. Her shady long border, filled with deciduous and evergreen shrubs, perennials and trees, is always a delight.Margaret has mixed in interesting foliage textures and colors along with making sure there is always something in bloom. She includes ferns, hosta, hellebore, camellias, viburnum, leucothoe, mahonia, azalea, holly and daphne.Duplicate the list of what Margaret grows for your shade garden and you’re guaranteed beauty, blooms and low maintenance.In its third season, “Gardening in Georgia” airs each Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. and is rebroadcast every Saturday at noon or 12:30 p.m. Learn more about it at the show’s Web site.The show is designed specifically for Georgia gardeners. It’s produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and GPTV.last_img read more


Landscape training

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia landscape workers can get valuable information andpesticide license credits at the North Georgia Landscape and TurfClinic Oct. 3 at Gainesville College.The program will cover the Worker Protection Standard, soilnutrition, tree and ornamental diseases, utility line safety,weeds in ornamentals and turf, water conservation and turfinsects.Participants can earn 4 hours of commercial pesticide licensecredit in category 24 (ornamentals and turf) and 2 hours ofprivate pesticide applicators credit. The update will start at 9a.m. and end at 4 p.m. The cost is $15.To learn more, call Billy Skaggs at (770) 531-6988. Or e-mail himat bskaggs@uga.edu.last_img


Tobacco referendum

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia tobacco growers have been mailed ballots and asked to vote on whether to keep the Georgia Tobacco Commission. To be counted, ballots must be postmarked by March 28.The GTC provides funds for research, promotion and education programs to help Georgia farmers. It does this through a grower assessment of 30 cents per hundredweight sold.The ballots were mailed Feb. 23. Any eligible grower who hasn’t gotten one or has lost one may get another by calling (404) 656-3678 or (800) 425-7675.last_img


Hypertension hazards

Posted On Jan 17 2021 by

first_imgBy Allie ByrdUniversity of GeorgiaHypertension is the most common chronic disease in the U.S. and is becoming a major health concern for Americans of all ages, says a University of Georgia specialist. A healthy blood pressure is defined as a systolic pressure of 120 mm Hg and a diastolic pressure of 80 mm Hg. Hypertension is defined as a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg or greater, said Crawley.Although genetics and family history can influence hypertension, she said, unhealthy choices such as smoking, eating certain foods, inactivity and being overweight cause it, too. Becoming more physically active, quitting smoking, keeping alcohol intake at a moderate level and eating more healthy foods rather than salty restaurant and convenience foods can also help reduce hypertension. Follow DASH diet Following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, diet has been proven to lower blood pressure up to 11 points, Crawley said.“It is one of the few clinically proven meal plans to treat a disease,” she said. When medication is prescribed, three to four medications may be needed to lower blood pressure to the desired range.Weight loss can also prove beneficial to controlling hypertension. “Losing weight helps the most if the person is overweight,” she said. “A person does not have to lose to an ideal body weight to see a positive result. Just a loss of 10 to 20 pounds is often enough to see an improvement.” center_img The diet includes eating eight to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables, at least three servings of whole grains and three servings of nonfat dairy foods each day. Only one to two ounces of meat are allowed per meal. The diet also requires eating several servings of cooked legumes, like beans and peas, and nuts several times a week. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is excessive force of the blood on the blood vessels as it circulates. It can cause problems such as heart attack, heart failure, vision loss, stroke and kidney disease, says Connie Crawley, a nutrition and health specialist with UGA Cooperative Extension. Know your numbers Unless a person is experiencing extremely high blood pressure, there are typically no symptoms. The condition can often go untreated.“It is important for people to keep track of their blood pressure and bring it to the attention of their healthcare provider if it is not in control,” she said. “Sometimes the health care professional is focusing on other health issues and may not notice an elevated blood pressure until the patient mentions it.” Lose weight, reduce stressLifestyle changes and medication are usually combined to treat the problem, she said.Stress management is helpful in reducing hypertension. Beneficial practices include deep breathing, yoga, tai chi, meditation, exercise, prayer or reducing responsibilities, Crawley says. last_img read more