Physicists investigate lower dimensions of the universe

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img More recently, physicists have been theorizing the possibility of lower dimensionality, in which the universe has only two or even one spatial dimension(s), along with one dimension of time. The theories suggest that the lower dimensions occurred in the past when the universe was much smaller and had a much higher energy level (and temperature) than today. Further, it appears that the concept of lower dimensions may already have some experimental evidence in cosmic ray observations.Now in a new study, physicists Jonas Mureika from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California, and Dejan Stojkovic from SUNY at Buffalo in Buffalo, New York, have proposed a new and independent method for experimentally detecting lower dimensions. They’ve published their study in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In 2010, a team of physicists including Stojkovic proposed a lower-dimensional framework in which spacetime is fundamentally a (1 + 1)-dimensional universe (meaning it contains one spatial dimension and one time dimension). In other words, the universe is a straight line that is “wrapped up” in such a way so that it appears (3 + 1)-dimensional at today’s higher energy scales, which is what we see. The scientists don’t know the exact energy levels (or the exact age of the universe) when the transitions between dimensions occurred. However, they think that the universe’s energy level and size directly determine its number of dimensions, and that the number of dimensions evolves over time as the energy and size change. They predict that the transition from a (1 + 1)- to a (2 + 1)-dimensional universe happened when the temperature of the universe was about 100 TeV (teraelectronvolts) or less, and the transition from a (2 + 1)- to a (3 + 1)-dimensional universe happened later at about 1 TeV. Today, the temperature of the universe is about 10-3 eV. So far, there may already be one piece of experimental evidence for the existence of a lower-dimensional structure at a higher energy scale. When observing families of cosmic ray particles in space, scientists found that, at energies higher than 1 TeV, the main energy fluxes appear to align in a two-dimensional plane. This means that, above a certain energy level, particles propagate in two dimensions rather than three dimensions. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the current study, Mureika and Stojkovic have proposed a second test for lower dimensions that would provide independent evidence for their existence. The test is based on the assumption that a (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which is a flat plane, has no gravitational degrees of freedom. This means that gravity waves and gravitons cannot have been produced during this epoch. So the physicists suggest that a future gravitational wave detector looking deep into space might find that primordial gravity waves cannot be produced beyond a certain frequency, and this frequency would represent the transition between dimensions. Looking backwards, it would appear that one of our spatial dimensions has “vanished.”The scientists added that it should be possible, though perhaps more difficult, to test for the existence of (1 + 1)-dimensional spacetime.“It will be challenging with the current experiments,” Stojkovic told PhysOrg.com. “But it is within the reach of both the LHC and cosmic ray experiments if the two-dimensional to one-dimensional crossover scale is 10 TeV.”Lower dimensions at higher energies could have several advantages for cosmologists. For instance, models of quantum gravity in (2 + 1) and (1 + 1) dimensions could overcome some of the problems that plague quantum gravity theories in (3 + 1) dimensions. Also, reducing the dimensions of spacetime might solve the cosmological constant problem, which is that the cosmological constant is fine-tuned to fit observations and does not match theoretical calculations. A solution may lie in the existence of energy that is currently hiding between two folds of our (3 + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which will open up into (4 + 1)-dimensional spacetime in the future when the universe’s decreasing energy level reaches another transition point.“A change of paradigm,” Stojkovic said about the significance of lower dimensions. “It is a new avenue to attack long-standing problems in physics.” More information: Jonas Mureika and Dejan Stojkovic. “Detecting Vanishing Dimensions via Primordial Gravitational Wave Astronomy.” Physical Review Letters 106, 101101 (2011). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.101101 Citation: Physicists investigate lower dimensions of the universe (2011, March 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-03-physicists-dimensions-universe.html (PhysOrg.com) — Several speculative theories in physics involve extra dimensions beyond our well-known four (which are broken down into three dimensions of space and one of time). Some theories have suggested 5, 10, 26, or more, with the extra spatial dimensions “hiding” within our observable three dimensions. One thing that all of these extra dimensions have in common is that none has ever been experimentally detected; they are all mathematical predictions. Who cares about the fourth dimension?last_img read more


Panasonic releases a solar charger with USB AA battery slots and LED

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — The idea of a solar charger is not a new one. There are a whole host of them for the mobile device, but a lot of them are too expensive to be purchased by the average consumer. Other charge devices too slowly. Only time will tell which solar charger becomes the pragmatic option. Panasonic has decided to throw its hat into the ring with its new BG-BL01 charger. The BG-BL01 is a combination device, both solar battery charger and emergency LED Light. The solar power come courtesy of a HIT Solar panel, the same type of current generation panels that are found on homes. The BG-BL01 also comes equipped with a USB port, two AA Battery Charger slots and three LED lights.The device itself is surprisingly small, at just 152×104×24mm and it weighs 150g. Panasonic claims that the device will take up to 15h to fully charge two AA Batteries. With a full charge users will get up to 10 hours of the highest brightness light or up to 60 hours worth of light at its lowest brightness. The LED lamps are at a capacity of 0.12W×3. The system will also be able to power a 500mA USB powered device in about 1h and 20 minutes. Panasonic releases wireless solar charging tablecenter_img The BG-BL01 is also IPX3 compliant, which makes it splash proof but not submersion resistance. The device will be on sale by the end of August 2011 and it is expected to retail for $75. It is expected to retail for this price in both Japan and the United States. Citation: Panasonic releases a solar charger with USB, AA battery slots and LED lights (2011, July 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-panasonic-solar-charger-usb-aa.html Explore furtherlast_img read more


Researchers find classical musical compositions adhere to power law

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img More information: Musical rhythm spectra from Bach to Joplin obey a 1/f power law, by Daniel Levitin, Parag Chordia, and Vinod Menon, PNAS, 2012. Credit: Wikipedia. Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com Is that Mozart or a machine? Software can compose music in classical, pop or jazz styles One-over-f equations describe the relative frequency of things that happen over time and can be used to describe such naturally occurring events as annual river flooding or the beating of a human heart. They have been used to describe the way pitch is used in music as well, but until now, no one has thought to test the idea that they could be used to describe the rhythm of the music too.To find out if this is the case, Levitin and his team analyzed (by measuring note length line by line) close to 2000 pieces of classical music from a wide group of noted composers. In so doing, they found that virtually every piece studied conformed to the power law. They also found that by adding another variable to the equation, called a beta, which was used to describe just how predictable a given piece was compared to other pieces, they could solve for beta and find a unique number of for each composer. After looking at the results as a whole, they found that works written by some classical composers were far more predictable than others, and that certain genres in general were more predictable than others too. Beethoven was the most predictable of the group studied, while Mozart was the least of the bunch. And symphonies are generally far more predictable than Ragtimes with other types falling somewhere in-between. In solving for beta, the team discovered that they had inadvertently developed a means for calculating a composer’s unique individual rhythm signature. In speaking with the university news group at McGill, Levitin said, “this was one of the most unanticipated and exciting findings of our research.”Another interesting aspect of the research is that because the patterns are based on the power law, the music the team studied shares the same sorts of patterns as fractals, i.e. elements in the rhythm that occur the second most often happen only half as often, the third, just a third as often and so forth. Thus, it’s not difficult to imagine music in a fractal patterns that are unique to individual composers.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Citation: Researchers find classical musical compositions adhere to power law (2012, February 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-02-classical-musical-compositions-adhere-power.html (PhysOrg.com) — A team of researchers, led by Daniel Levitin of McGill University, has found after analyzing over two thousand pieces of classical music that span four hundred years of history, that virtually all of them follow a one-over-f (1/f) power distribution equation. He and his team have published the results of their work in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Network theory expert sees Web pages as 19 clicks apart

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Citation: Network theory expert sees Web pages as 19 clicks apart (2013, February 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-network-theory-expert-web-pages.html © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Explore further More information: rsta.royalsocietypublishing.or … 87/20120375.abstractblogs.smithsonianmag.com/scien … y-19-clicks-or-less/center_img Social networking for terrorists Despite enormous “pieces” of Web such as sites, hosted images, and videos—the Indexed Web contains at least 14.33 billion pages, according to the February 19 tally of WorldWideWebSize.com, it takes 19 or fewer clicks to get to any of them from another, regardless of scale.Barabási, who is known for his work on network science, has looked at the Web’s structure. The Web is an information network, in which the nodes are documents connected by links, noted in the paper’s abstract. “Other well-known network structures include the Internet, a physical network where the nodes are routers and the links are physical connections, and organizations, where the nodes are people and the links represent communications.”The author noted how, with a path length of about 19, connections are made, with massive hubs such as Google and Facebook behaving as the key super-connectors. Similar to the small-world concept of a limited number of degrees of separation, the super-connectors render the Web access experience into a small world. For ease of access and connectivity, the good news is that it only takes a small number of superconnecting sites to get us where we want to go The bad news is the same. Attackers removing this relatively small number of Web pages would cause serious problems if, in the targeted attack, the most connected nodes were deliberately removed first. Knocking out a few critical nodes that connect the Web may isolate various pages and hinder movement. Barabási is known for his work in network theory and is described as a pioneer in this field. He is a professor at Northeastern University in Massachusetts and he directs the university’s Center for Complex Network Research. The Center’s studies include the Internet’s dynamics and complex networks inside the cell. The Center’s premise is that, regardless of the kind of network, whether the network under study is the Web or the economy, the same principles largely apply. Many networks have common principles that can be studied using methods in theoretical physics. Credit: Opte Project (Phys.org)—The concept of its being a small world after all is now being placed in the scientific context of the wide, wide Web as a small Web after all. According to a physicist, Web pages are actually no greater than 19 clicks apart. Put another way: Everything on the Web is connected by 19 clicks. Put another way? Any two Web pages are no more than 19 clicks apart. How can that be? The paper discussing this, by Albert-László Barabási, has been published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.last_img read more


Researchers discover a way to switch liquid crystals off faster

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img LCDs, have of course, become widely popular as the display type of choice for computers, smarthphones and handheld devices—they form the most basic part of such screens, the pixels. Each pixel is made up of a sandwich of liquid crystals set between pairs of glass plates—one of which polarizes light shone from behind. Light movement is controlled by turning on or off a small electric charge to cause the crystals to rotate a little bit or to relax. With state of the art technology, rotating the crystals happens very quickly when current is applied—it’s the relaxing back to their natural state that occurs relatively slowly. In this new effort, the researchers found a way around this problem by using crystals that don’t need to be rotated to control the way light is allowed to pass through, or not.The solution was found in using a type of molecule called CCN-47 as the basis for the crystals—when placed together in a solution they naturally align in a perpendicular fashion. This meant that they wouldn’t have to be rotated to change light passing through. Instead, they found that using such molecules as the basis for crystals meant that the polarization of the light could be rotated (by changing the way the electric field was applied) instead of the crystals—a much faster process. Testing showed the relaxation state could be achieved in just 30 nanoseconds instead of the usual several milliseconds.The researchers don’t expect this new type of LCD to replace those now used for common display devices—those are now fast enough that any gains in speed would not be noticeable to the human eye. Instead, they believe the new types of LCDs might be used to make new kinds of lasers for use in satellite communications or perhaps in cameras. Explore further Citation: Researchers discover a way to switch liquid crystals off faster (2013, September 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-liquid-crystals-faster.html Journal information: Physical Review Letters (Phys.org) —A team of physicists at Kent State University has discovered a way to cause liquid crystals to relax to their natural state faster. The result, the team explains in their paper published in Physical Review Letters, is a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) display device that has much faster change rates than conventional LCDs. Experimental setup: NLC cell sandwiched between two 45-degree prisms. Credit: Volodymyr Borshch et al.center_img © 2013 Phys.org Researchers develop molecular switch that changes liquid crystal colors More information: Nanosecond Electro-Optic Switching of a Liquid Crystal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 107802 (2013) link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.107802AbstractElectrically induced reorientation of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) molecules caused by dielectric anisotropy of the material is a fundamental phenomenon widely used in modern technologies. Its Achilles heel is a slow (millisecond) relaxation from the field-on to the field-off state. We present an electro-optic effect in an NLC with a response time of about 30 ns to both the field-on and field-off switching. This effect is caused by the electric field induced modification of the order parameters and does not require reorientation of the optic axis (director). This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Converting waste heat into electricity works better in two dimensions

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Explore further More information: Sunao Shimizu et al. “Enhanced thermopower in ZnO two-dimensional electron gas.” PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1525500113 The enlarged illustration (in the circle) shows a 2D electron gas on the surface of a zinc oxide semiconductor. When exposed to a temperature difference, the 2D region exhibits a significantly higher thermoelectric performance compared to that of bulk zinc oxide. The bottom figure shows that the electronic density of states distribution is quantized for 2D and continuous for 3D materials. Credit: Shimizu et al. ©2016 PNAS This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Improved thermoelectric materials with atomic layer deposition Citation: Converting waste heat into electricity works better in two dimensions (2016, June 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-electricity-dimensions.htmlcenter_img (Phys.org)—The large amount of waste heat produced by power plants and automobile engines can be converted into electricity due to the thermoelectric effect, a physics effect that converts temperature differences into electrical energy. Now in a new study, researchers have confirmed theoretical predictions that two-dimensional (2D) materials—those that are as thin as a single nanometer—exhibit a significantly higher thermoelectric effect than three-dimensional (3D) materials, which are typically used for these applications. © 2016 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The study, which is published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Sunao Shimizu et al., could provide a way to improve the recycling of waste heat into useful energy.Previous research has predicted that 2D materials should have better thermoelectric properties than 3D materials because the electrons in 2D materials are more tightly confined in a much smaller space. This confinement effect changes the way that the electrons can arrange themselves. In 3D materials, this arrangement (called the density of states distribution) is continuous, but in 2D materials, this distribution becomes quantized—only certain values are allowed. At certain densities, the quantization means that less energy is required to move electrons around, which in turn increases the efficiency with which the material can convert heat into electrical energy.Experimentally demonstrating this thermoelectric enhancement in 2D materials has been challenging because of the difficulty in fabricating 2D materials with the appropriate electron arrangement. Although previous experiments have demonstrated this enhancement in certain materials, it has been unclear whether the mechanism of enhancement agrees with predictions.In the new study, the researchers fabricated a 2D electron gas on the surface of a zinc oxide semiconductor, and showed that this material’s thermoelectric properties can be directly compared to those of bulk zinc oxide because both 2D and 3D versions have a single electron band. “In order to discuss the thermoelectric effect unique to 2D materials, it is very important to control the carrier density in the 2D layers,” Shimizu, a researcher at the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Saitama, Japan, told Phys.org. “Our approach, the electric field effect with ionic gating, enabled us to produce an ideal 2D layer and to control the carrier number.”Using their new approach, the researchers found that the 2D electron gas exhibits a thermoelectric effect that is approximately three times larger than that of the 3D semiconductor.This enhancement ratio is about twice as large as predicted by a simple simulation, which the researchers suspect could be due to inaccuracies in estimating the thickness of the 2D layer, where even a few nanometers can make a big difference. They hope that future research will lead to more accurate approaches of estimating the thickness, providing a better measure of the thermoelectric effect enhancement. “The results of this study clearly remind us of the importance of low-dimensional materials and devices for realizing high-performance thermoelectric conversion,” Shimizu said. “In the future, I would like to investigate other low-dimensional materials, including nanotubes and quantum dots.”last_img read more


Former FARC Leaders Announce New Stage O

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_img Jacobo Alape via YouTube by NPR News Sasha Ingber 8.29.19 4:45pm Top rebels from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia have announced a “new stage of fighting,” despite a peace accord that the leftist guerrilla group signed with the national government almost three years ago.In a 32-minute YouTube video posted Thursday, more than 20 armed fighters stood in green fatigues and in front of a sign that read, “As long as there is a will to fight there will be hope for victory.”A guerrilla leader involved in the peace negotiations accused the government of betraying key components of the deal. “The state has not fulfilled its most important obligation, which is to guarantee the life of its citizens and especially avoid assassinations for political reasons,” said Luciano Marin, known widely by his nom de guerre, Iván Márquez.Under the peace treaty, thousands of Marxist- and Leninist-inspired guerrillas gave up their arms in exchange for the Colombian government’s commitment to protecting them and to building infrastructure in poor, isolated communities in the countryside. In May, Marin said that it was a mistake for FARC fighters to surrender their weapons without first getting guarantees.In the video, which appeared to be filmed in the jungle, Marin said the group planned to work with the National Liberation Army (ELN), another leftist guerrilla army which has resorted to kidnapping, extortion and violence.Hours later, an ELN leader embraced the announcement. “Better late than never,” Omar Gómez, known as Uriel, said through a face mask after giving a thumbs up and a clenched fist.Former FARC commander Rodrigo Londoño, now the president of Colombia’s Revolutionary Alternative Common Force political party, reiterated his commitment to the peace accord. He said on Thursday that the majority support working toward peace. “Now more than ever, our commitment as a majority, as a party, as a country, is to peace, defending and complying with the agreement,” he said. “Anyone who strays away from peace is mistaken, as those who have always attacked it.”Negotiations to end Colombia’s longest war, tracing back to the 1960s, started in 2012. Former President Juan Manuel Santos and Londoño signed a peace agreement in 2016. The move triggered a new wave of violence from armed groups that fought to take control of the FARC’s territory, displacing thousands in rural communities. Colombians, in a narrow margin, had previously voted to reject a peace deal.Last year, Colombians elected President Iván Duque, who campaigned on a promise to revise the controversial peace deal. A conservative populist, he said the agreement was too lenient for rebels who had kidnapped Colombian citizens and committed other atrocities. He vowed to make “war victims the focal point of the peace process.”Since taking office, he’s been accused of not just slowing down peace reforms but muddling significant facets of the agreement — especially tribunals that would allow insurgents to testify under broad immunity.”We cannot be stupid enough to think that … the government is an ally for peace,” Naryi Vargas, a researcher at the Peace and Reconciliation Foundation, an organization based in Colombia, tweeted Thursday.Bogota-based activist Luis Ernesto Gómez blamed Duque and former Colombian President Álvaro Uribe for FARC’s announcement. “Their political calculations and systematic sabotage of the Peace Process robbed us of a golden opportunity to stop killing each other and start making progress.”The 52-year war waged by FARC left at least 220,000 people dead.Duque has not publicly responded to the FARC video, and the Colombian Embassy in the United States did not immediately respond to NPR’s request for comment.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. Former FARC Leaders Announce ‘New Stage Of Fighting,… last_img read more


Undercooked food on Duronto Exp rly to end caterers contract

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgKolkata: Passengers of Puri-Sealdah Duronto Express today complained of “undercooked” food served by the onboard caterer, following which the IRCTC decided not to renew its contract with the company responsible for supplying food in the train. Stating that strict punitive action will be taken against the caterer, IRCTC group general manager (east zone) Debasish Chanda said an enquiry has been ordered into the complaints by the passengers of the train, which arrived at Sealdah this morning. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed “The food was served in the south central zone of IRCTC at Puri. On receiving complaints over the quality and standard of the food served last night, we have decided to not renew the contract of the catering company,” Chanda said. He said the contract of the company to supply food in Puri-Sealdah Duronto Express was due to expire within a few days and owing to the complaint, it would not be renewed. “Passengers complained of undercooked chicken served to them in the train for dinner last night,” said the Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) official. The 22202 Puri-Sealdah Duronto Express is run by the Kolkata-headquartered Eastern Railway.last_img read more


2600 banking service points coming soon across nonbanking villages

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first_imgKolkata: Following the direction of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, the state Cooperation department is setting up ‘banking service points’ at non-banking villages.The Chief Minister had directed to take necessary steps to ensure that people in rural parts of the state do not need to travel long distances in order to avail banking services.There were around 700 Gram Panchayats without banking services. In a bid to end such an inconvenience, the state Cooperation department took up the step of installing banking service points. As many as 2,600 banking service points are being set up. Most of the banking services facilities will be available at the service points. Online banking services will also be available. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeArup Roy, the state Cooperation minister, announced that there won’t be anymore villages in the state without banking services facilities while addressing the convention on direct paddy procurement organised at Nazrul Mancha on Monday in which representatives of 1,000 cooperative societies were present.State Education Minister Partha Chatterjee, state Urban Development and Municipal Affairs minister Firhad Hakim, state Food and Supplies minister Jyotipriya Mallick and state Agriculture Marketing minister Tapan Dasgupta were present at the inaugural function. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedMentioning that around 28 lakh metric tonne paddy was purchased directly from farmers in the last fiscal, Roy said: “This year as well his department is ready to go for direct purchase as per the target that will be set by the Chief Minister.” He further said that 80 percent of the total paddy purchase in the state takes place through cooperative societies. “Moreover, one lakh families will get Rs 18,000 each as financial support for poultry farming,” he added. Chatterjee said distress sell of agricultural produce by farmers has become a matter of past and this comes at a time when cooperative banks have provided more help through agricultural loans compared to other banks. He also took a dig at the erstwhile Left Front government for corruption in the cooperation system.It may be mentioned that around Rs 4,000 crore was disbursed as agricultural loan in 2017-18 through cooperatives, while the amount has increased to Rs 5200 in 2018-19. He further said he will be speaking to the Chief Minister to ensure that storage capacity for vegetables is increased. The step is needed to check wastage of vegetables.While speaking at the programme, Hakim said: “Farmers income has increased manifold in the state and it has ensured development in the state’s rural economy.” He added that no more distress sell takes place in the state.Mallick, whose department works hand in glove with the state Cooperation department in direct purchase of paddy, said: “Bengal is now a role model for the Centre as we directly transfer money to the bank account of farmers. Moreover, a toll free number will be introduced on which a farmer can call and inform if he wants to sell paddy. Subsequently, officials will visit his place with a truck to buy the same.”He further maintained that his department is yet to get Rs 300 crore for supplying rice for ICDS centres and midday meals. “Now, the Centre and the Food Corporation of India are at loggerheads over who’s going to pay for the same,” Mallick said adding that his department is prepared to supply 4 lakh metric tonne rice for ICDS centres and midday meal.last_img read more


Carnatic music at its best

Posted On Aug 31 2019 by

first_imgViolin is considered one of the most noble percussion instruments that has the capability to produce music of any genre ranging from classical to western to fusion. The Carnatic music Violin arangetram of Anandh Kalyanaraman and Shivapriya Dayal was held on January 9 at the Sri Sathya Sai auditorium in the national Capital. They have been training for five years under the tutelage of Guru Kalaimamani V.S.K. Chakrapani, who was a top grade artist of All India Radio. He has been performing, teaching and promoting carnatic music for the past five decades. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The chief guest of the evening was Aruna Bahuguna, Director of the National Police Academy, Hyderabad. Dr Vageesh, retired Deputy Director General of All India Radio, in his speech complimented the efforts of the children. Padma Shri Guru Geeta Chandran spoke of the importance of music training in our lives.The arangetram commenced with a varnam in raga arabhi, a composition of Tiger Varadachari, followed by a Muthuswami Dikshitar’s composition vathapi ganapathim in raga hamsadhwani. The main piece played by the children was a kriti by Tyagaraja –  rama ninnu nammina – in raga mohanam, which they started with an alapana. The percussion accompaniments came together to perform what is called the ‘taniyavartanam’.  ‘taniyavartanam’.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe two hour long concert was a journey through compositions ranging from that of Arunagirinathar, the 15th century shaivite saint to the 18th century composers-Thyagaraja, Dikshitar, Puranadaradasa, patriotic songs of Subramania Bharati, Narsinh Mehta’s Vaishnava janato, to name a few. They concluded with a thillana in raga dhanasree composed by the Maharaja of Travancore – Swathithirunal.The musicians included Anandh Kalyanaraman, class 9 student of D.A.V. School, Vasant Kunj and Shivapriya Dayal, a student of class 8 of Shriram School, Aravali, Gurgaon, who apart from being great musicians are also academic enthusiasts, performing very well at school.The children were ably supported by accompanying artists – Shri Padmanabhan on Mridangam, Shri Harinarayanan on Ghatam and Shri Ravikiran on Morsing.last_img read more